Badcock History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Badcock is tied to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of England. It comes from the personal name Bartholomew. Bat(e) was a pet form of this personal name and when combined with 'cock' which was a common suffix for other names like Wilcox, Simcock and others became Batcock.

Early Origins of the Badcock family

The surname Badcock was first found in Worcestershire, where they held a family seat from ancient times, long before the Norman Conquest in 1066.

Early History of the Badcock family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Badcock research. Another 61 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1790, 1622, 1698, 1668 and 1814 are included under the topic Early Badcock History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Badcock Spelling Variations

Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Badcock has undergone many spelling variations, including Babcock, Badcock, Babbcock, Batcock, Badcocke and many more.

Early Notables of the Badcock family (pre 1700)

Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Badcock Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Badcock Ranking

In Newfoundland, Canada, the name Badcock is the 335th most popular surname with an estimated 137 people with that name. [1]


United States Badcock migration to the United States +

To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Badcock were among those contributors:

Badcock Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • George Badcock, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1638 [2]
  • David Badcock, who settled in Massachusetts in 1640
  • David Badcock, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1640 [2]
  • James. Badcock, who arrived in Maryland in 1662 [2]
Badcock Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • James Badcock, who landed in Connecticut in 1702 [2]
  • Jonathan Badcock, who landed in Connecticut in 1711 [2]
  • John Badcock, who settled in Maryland in 1724
  • Mr. John Badcock, aged 19, emigrating from Falmouth, Cornwall to the United States, to become an indebted servant to Peter Simpson, a chapman originally from London, England on 18th July 1728 [3]

Canada Badcock migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Badcock Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • William Badcock, who was a constable of Carbonear District, Newfoundland in 1730 [4]
  • William Badcock, who was on record in Harbour Grace, Newfoundland in 1792 [4]

Australia Badcock migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Badcock Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. George Badcock, English convict who was convicted in Bristol, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 5th June 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [5]
  • Mr. William Badcock, (b. 1811), aged 22, English convict who was convicted in Somerset, England for life for house breaking, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 27th April 1833, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [5]
  • Mr. Richard Badcock, (b. 1810), aged 33, English brick maker who was convicted in Bridgewater, Somerset, England for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Cressy" on 28th April 1843, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [6]
  • Paul Badcock, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Arab" in 1843 [7]
  • Frederick Badcock, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Hooghly" in 1846 [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Badcock migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Badcock Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John V. Badcock, (b. 1856), aged 21, Cornish farm labourer departing on 5th November 1877 aboard the ship "Carnatic" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 1st February 1878 [9]

West Indies Badcock migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [10]
Badcock Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • William Badcock, aged 20, who arrived in St Christopher in 1633 [2]

Contemporary Notables of the name Badcock (post 1700) +

  • Wogan S. Badcock, American founder of Badcock Home Furniture, now a chain of over 320 furniture stores in 1904
  • Thomas Stanhope Badcock (1749-1821), English politician, High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire in 1809
  • Samuel Badcock (1747-1788), English theologian and literary critic
  • Richard Neale Badcock (1721-1783), English merchant and a director of the South Sea Company
  • Lovell Badcock (1744-1797), English politician, High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire in 1795, brother of Thomas Stanhope Badcock
  • John Badcock (1883-1940), English cricketer who played for Hampshire from 1906 to 1908
  • John Badcock (1816-1830), English sporting writer
  • Jack Clement Badcock, English naturalist, historian, columnist, writer and painter
  • William Stanhope Badcock (1788-1859), birth name of Vice Admiral William Stanhope Lovell, British vice-admiral and veteran of Trafalgar
  • Frederick Theodore "Ted" Badcock (1897-1982), New Zealand Test cricketer who played seven Tests for New Zealand between 1930 and 1933
  • ... (Another 5 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Hood
  • Mr. John H Badcock (b. 1923), English Stoker 2nd Class serving for the Royal Navy from Maidenhead, Berkshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [11]


  1. ^ The order of Common Surnames in 1955 in Newfoundland retrieved on 20th October 2021 (retrieved from Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland by E.R. Seary corrected edition ISBN 0-7735-1782-0)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to USA 1718 - 1759, Indentured servitude [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_america_1718_59_indentured_servitude.pdf
  4. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 14th July 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/atlas
  6. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 21st May 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/cressy
  7. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ARAB 1843. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1843Arab.htm
  8. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) HOOGHLY 1846. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1846Hooghly.htm
  9. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  10. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  11. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate