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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


Ask Early Origins



The surname Ask was first found in the county of Cumberland, however some of the family were found at Aughton in the East Riding of Yorkshire in early times. "The church [of Aughton], the chancel of which was rebuilt in 1839, has a low embattled tower, built by Christopher, son of the unfortunate Robert Aske who was beheaded at York in the reign of Henry VIII., 1537, as a principal in the insurrection called the "Pilgrimage of Grace," occasioned by the suppression of the monasteries. On the chancel floor is a fine brass slab, on which are graven the effigies of Richard Aske and his lady, who died in the fifteenth century. Near the east bank of the river Derwent the moats and trenches of an ancient castle are still visible; and in the vicinity of the church is a large mound of earth, the site of the castellated mansion of the Aske family." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Eske is a township, in the parish of St. John, Beverley, union of Beverley, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, in the East Riding of Yorkshire. "This place, in Domesday Book Asche, derives its name from the British word signifying water. It was given at an early period to the collegiate church of St. John." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Ask Spelling Variations


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Ask Spelling Variations



During the era when a person's name, tribe and posterity was one of his most important possessions, many different spellings were found in the archives examined. Ask occurred in many references, and spelling variations of the name found included Askey, Aske, Askew, Aiscough, Ayscoghe, Asker, Ayscough, Aiskey and many more.

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Ask Early History


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Ask Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ask research. Another 281 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1590, 1911, 1521, 1546, 1540, 1438, 1450, 1558, 1590, 1641, 1624, 1596, 1654, 1618, 1668, 1659, 1550, 1616, 1616, 1671, 1618, 1668, 1659, 1619, 1689, 1650, 1699, 1685, 1699, 1699 and 1774 are included under the topic Early Ask History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Ask Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Ask Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable amongst the family name during their early history was Sir Hugh Askey; Anne Askew (1521-1546), English poet and Protestant who was condemned as a heretic, the only woman to have been both tortured in the Tower of London and burnt at the stake; William Ayscough (or Aiscough), (died 1540), Bishop...

Another 144 words (10 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ask Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Gradually becoming disenchanted with life in Ireland many of these uprooted families sailed aboard the armada of sailing ships known as the "White Sails" which plied the stormy Atlantic. These overcrowded ships often arrived with only 60 to 70% of their original passenger list, many dying of illness and the elements, were buried at sea. In North America, early immigrants bearing the family name Ask, or a spelling variation of the surname include:

Ask Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Tho Ask, who arrived in Virginia in 1664 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Michall Ask, aged 22, who arrived in Maryland in 1683 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fac et spera
Motto Translation: Do and hope.


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Ask Family Crest Products


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Ask Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Other References

  1. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  3. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  4. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  5. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  6. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  7. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  8. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  9. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  10. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  11. ...

The Ask Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Ask Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 17 June 2016 at 10:49.

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