Argynd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Argynd is a name that came to England in the 11th century wave of migration that was set off by the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Argynd family lived in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England, where they held lands since the early Middle Ages. The family were "from the town and castle of Argenton, Berry, held in 1080 be Geoffroi, Sire d'Argenton, whose descendants continued there for twelve generations. David d'Argenton (perhaps his brother) held lands de capite in Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire (Domesday.) He is styled David de Argentomago or Argentomo; but the name gradually lapsed to Argentein or Argentine. His manor or Wymondley in Cambridgeshire was held by grand serjeanty, 'to serve the King on his coronation day with a silver cup'; and the English Argentines consequently substituted three covered cups to the torteauxes that had been borne by their ancestors in France." [1]

Early Origins of the Argynd family

The surname Argynd was first found in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England. "The descendants of this Norman chieftain, David de Argentine, became feudal barons of great personal distinction. Reginald de Argentine, who appears to have been fifth in descent from the companion in arms of the Conqueror, succeeded all his father Giles de Argentine's vast estates, including the manor of Great Wymondeley, in Cambridgeshire. Of the same ancestry was Reginald de Argentine, who, in the 21 Henry III being a knight templar, was standard bearer of the Christian army in a great battle against the Turks, near Antioch, wherein he was slain." [2] Other early records include Geoffrey Argent was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Northamptonshire in 1180. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Richard de Arengtein in Hertfordshire and Reginald de Argente in Essex. Reginald de Argentein was listed in the Feet of Fines in Norfolk in 1281. [3]

Important Dates for the Argynd family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Argynd research. Another 63 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1507, 1625, 1649 and 1568 are included under the topic Early Argynd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Argynd Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Argynd has been recorded under many different variations, including Argent, Argentine, Argenton, Argente and others.

Early Notables of the Argynd family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Argentine (died 1507), an English physician who attended Edward V of England and later Arthur, Prince of Wales and was Provost of King's College, Cambridge; John Argent, who was a "Doctor of Physic,"...
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Argynd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Argynd family

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Argynds were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: William Argent, who settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1672; Sarah Argent, who settled in Maryland in 1678; George Argent, who settled in North Carolina in 1736.

Citations

  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
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