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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The history of the Argentine family name begins after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They lived in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England, where they held lands since the early Middle Ages. The family were "from the town and castle of Argenton, Berry, held in 1080 be Geoffroi, Sire d'Argenton, whose descendants continued there for twelve generations. David d'Argenton (perhaps his brother) held lands de capite in Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire (Domesday.) He is styled David de Argentomago or Argentomo; but the name gradually lapsed to Argentein or Argentine. His manor or Wymondley in Cambridgeshire was held by grand serjeanty, 'to serve the King on his coronation day with a silver cup'; and the English Argentines consequently substituted three covered cups to the torteauxes that had been borne by their ancestors in France." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3


Argentine Early Origins



The surname Argentine was first found in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England. "The descendants of this Norman chieftain, David de Argentine, became feudal barons of great personal distinction. Reginald de Argentine, who appears to have been fifth in descent from the companion in arms of the Conqueror, succeeded all his father Giles de Argentine's vast estates, including the manor of Great Wymondeley, in Cambridgeshire. Of the same ancestry was Reginald de Argentine, who, in the 21 Henry III being a knight templar, was standard bearer of the Christian army in a great battle against the Turks, near Antioch, wherein he was slain." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
Other early records include Geoffrey Argent was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Northamptonshire in 1180. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Richard de Arengtein in Hertfordshire and Reginald de Argente in Essex. Reginald de Argentein was listed in the Feet of Fines in Norfolk in 1281. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

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Argentine Spelling Variations


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Argentine Spelling Variations



Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Argent, Argentine, Argenton, Argente and others.

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Argentine Early History


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Argentine Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Argentine research. Another 125 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1507, 1625 and 1649 are included under the topic Early Argentine History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Argentine Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Argentine Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Argentine Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Because of the political and religious discontent in England, families began to migrate abroad in enormous numbers. Faced with persecution and starvation at home, the open frontiers and generally less oppressive social environment of the New World seemed tantalizing indeed to many English people. The trip was difficult, and not all made it unscathed, but many of those who did get to Canada and the United States made important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers with Argentine name or one of its variants: William Argent, who settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1672; Sarah Argent, who settled in Maryland in 1678; George Argent, who settled in North Carolina in 1736.

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Argentine Family Crest Products


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Argentine Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

Other References

  1. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  2. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  3. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  4. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  5. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  6. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  7. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  8. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  9. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  10. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  11. ...

The Argentine Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Argentine Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 29 March 2016 at 13:02.

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