Annabile History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

It was among those Anglo-Saxon tribes that once ruled over Britain that the name Annabile was formed. The name was derived from the female personal name Anabel, which was originally derived from the Latin word amablis, which means lovable. [1]

"There is no difficulty about it. Originally it was Amable or Amabel, but very soon became Annabel, whence the Scottish Annaple and Annabella. " [2]

"There is no evidence for the use of Hannibal as a Christian name in England before 1619 in Cornwall." [3]

Early Origins of the Annabile family

The surname Annabile was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 where we found entries as a forename and surname: Amabilia (without surname), Buckinghamshire; John filius Amabilie, Huntingdonshire; and John Amable Cambridgeshire. [2]

The Close Rolls listed Richard Anabilla, temp. Richard II, Mathew Hanybal, 39 Henry III (in the 39th year of King Henry III's reign), John Anable, 22 Edward III (during the 22nd year of King Edward III's reign.) [2]

In Cheshire, Roger, George Anabull(e) was listed there in 1499 and 1539. Thomas Hannyball was listed in Oxfordshire in 1513 and John Anyable was listed in Suffolk in 1568. [3]

Early History of the Annabile family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Annabile research. Another 104 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1166, 1256, 1275, 1282, 1792, 1821, 1531, 1504, 1513, 1515, 1520 and 1523 are included under the topic Early Annabile History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Annabile Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Annabile include Annabell, Anabell, Anebelle, Annabal, Annable, Anable, Amable, Amabilis, Annible, Hunnable, Hannibal, Honeyball, Honeybell and many more.

Early Notables of the Annabile family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Thomas Hannibal (d. 1531), English judge who was incepted in the canon law at the university of Cambridge in 1504, and the same year was installed prebendary of Gevendale in the church of York. "He was incorporated D.C.L. at Oxford in 1513, and graduated LL.D. at Cambridge, and received the appointment of vicar-general to Silvester, bishop of Worcester, in the following year. He entered the...
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Annabile Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Annabile family

Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Annabile were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records: Anthony Annabal, who sailed to Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621; Jane Annable to Plymouth in 1623; John Annable to Massachusetts in 1641; Robert Annable to Massachusetts in 1690.



  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)


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