Angay History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the Angay family goes back to the Medieval landscape of northern France, to that coastal region known as Normandy. The name is derived from the family living in the former province of Anjou, which comprised parts of southern Armorica, Indre-et-Loire, and Sarthe. The ancient capital of Anjou was Angers and, from the 10th century, this region was a countship belonging to the Plantagenet dynasty. Anjou was attached to the English Crown in 1156, after Henry II, the son of the Count of Anjou, became King of England. However, the territory was recovered by Philippe II in 1206 and, in 1487, the province was secured as Crown land by the French Crown.

Early Origins of the Angay family

The surname Angay was first found in Normandy (French: Normandie), the former Duchy of Normandy, where the family held a family seat from ancient times.

Some of the family emigrated to England as in the Domesday Book of 1086, "several of the name are found. The principal land-owner among them, who is supposed to have been of Breton origin, held considerable estates in Devonshire under Baldwin de Meules." [1]

"John de Aunger served as knight of the shire for Leicester in three of Edward I.'s parliaments, and in the first held by Edward II. Josceline D'Aunger in 1169 witnessed the foundation charter of Lanercost Abbey, and Ralph de Angers in the thirteenth century held lands in Wilts. Ralph de Aungers was Sheriff of Notts, 49 and 50 Henry III. " [1]

Early History of the Angay family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Angay research. Another 264 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1060, 1083, 1568, 1629, 1634, 1638, and 1720 are included under the topic Early Angay History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Angay Spelling Variations

French surnames were subject to numerous alterations in spelling because of the various cultural groups that inhabited specific regions. Eventually, each region possessed its own local dialect of the French language. The early development of the French language, however, was also influenced by other languages. For example, Old French was infused with Germanic words and sounds when barbarian tribes invaded and settled in France after the fall of the Roman Empire. Middle French also borrowed heavily from the Italian language during the Renaissance. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Angay is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Anger, Angers, Angier, Ange, Dange, d'Angeros, Dangeros, d'Anger, d'Ange, d'Angier, d'Angers, Anget, Angay, Angey, Angé, d'Anget, d'Angay, d'Angey, d'Angé, Angger, Anggers, Anggier, d'Angger, d'Anggers, d'Anggier, Ager, Agey, d'Agey, Ageais, d'Ageais, Aggeais, Lange, Angerot, Dangerot, d'Angerot and many more.

Early Notables of the Angay family (pre 1700)

Another 47 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Angay Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Angay family

In 1643, 109 years after the first landings by Cartier, there were only about 300 people in Quebec. Migration was slow. The fur trade attracted migrants, both noble and commoner. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the French Acadian presence in the Maritimes had reached 500. The French founded Lower Canada, thus becoming one of the two great founding nations of Canada. The family name Angay has made many distinguished contributions in France and New France to the world of science, culture, religion, and education. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Angay were Elizabeth Anger settled in Virginia in the year of 1723; Nicolas Anger settled in the province of Québec, in Pointes-aux-Trembles, by the year of 1685..



The Angay Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fides
Motto Translation: Faith.


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3


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