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Alday History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



It was in the Scottish/English Borderlands that the Strathclyde-Briton people first used the ancient name Alday. It was a name for someone who lived near the mountain called Holy Day in the county of Annandale. However some sources claim the "name is derived from the slogan or war cry of the family 'a holy day, a holy day.'" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Sims, Clifford Stanley The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames. 1862. Print.
[2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print


Early Origins of the Alday family


The surname Alday was first found in Annandale. "The Hallidays of Hoddom, Dumfriesshire, were an old family there, and probably gave their name to Halliday Hill in the parish of Dalton." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
One of the first records of the family was found in 1303 when Adam de Halide was a juror on inquest at St. Andrews. A few years later, John Halyday was an archer of the East March in 1404 and Ambrose Halyday and David Halyday were merchants in Edinburgh in 1479.

Despite the general understanding that the family was Scottish in origin, early records in England, specifically the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list Richard Haliday in Buckinghamshire; and Gerard Haliday in Suffolk. Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379, listed: Willelmus Haliday; Johannes Halyday; and Adam Halyday. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
The reader should be reminded that Yorkshire's proximity to the Scottish border probably points to the aforementioned Scottish origin.

One romantic source notes: "A well-known Scottish Border Clan, who from their great animosity against the Southron are said to have adopted the war-cry or slogan of A Holy Day, (Scottice, 'a Haly Day'), because the chiefs and people of Annandale, whenever they made a raid or foray upon the Saxon border, accounted the day spent in rapine and slaughter a holy one. " [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.


Early History of the Alday family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Alday research.
Another 198 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1120, 1605, 1415, 1593, 1661, 1626, 1550, 1612, 1605, 1606, 1697, 1697, 1516, 1576, 1576, 1570, 1685 and 1739 are included under the topic Early Alday History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Alday Spelling Variations


Surnames that evolved in Scotland in the Middle Ages often appear under many spelling variations. These are due to the practice of spelling according to sound in the era before dictionaries had standardized the English language. Alday has appeared as Halliday, Haliday and others.

Early Notables of the Alday family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family at this time was Walter Halliday (also spelled Haliday, Halyday, and Holliday), Scottish royal minstrel at the battle of Agincourt in 1415, thought to be son of the chieftain of Annandale in Dumfries, founder member of a minstrels' guild, now known as the Worshipful Company of Musicians...
Another 127 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Alday Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Alday family to Ireland


Some of the Alday family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 229 words (16 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Alday family to the New World and Oceana


The North American colonies beckoned, with their ample land and opportunity as their freedom from the persecution suffered by so many Clan families back home. Many Scots even fought against England in the American War of Independence to gain this freedom. Recently, clan societies have allowed the ancestors of these brave Scottish settlers to rediscover their familial roots. Among them:

Alday Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Jasper Alday, who arrived in North Carolina in 1748 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Alday Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Samuel Alday, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Mount Stuart Elphinstone" in 1851 [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOUNT STUART ELPHINSTONE 1851. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851MountStuartElphinstone.gif

Contemporary Notables of the name Alday (post 1700)


  • W. "Gene" E. Alday Jr. (1957-2016), American Republican politician, Member of the Mississippi House of Representatives (2012-2016) [8]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2017, January 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Alday Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quarta saluti
Motto Translation: The fourth to health.


Alday Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Sims, Clifford Stanley The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames. 1862. Print.
  2. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  3. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MOUNT STUART ELPHINSTONE 1851. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851MountStuartElphinstone.gif
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2017, January 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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