Wollind History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

The Wollind surname comes from the Anglo-Norman personal name Walweyn, the Old German forename Waldwin, or the Old English personal name Wealdwine, which means power-friend.

Early Origins of the Wollind family

The surname Wollind was first found in Pembrokeshire (Welsh: Sir Benfro), a county in south-west Wales, anciently part of the Welsh kingdom of Deheubarth, where the family claim descent from Gualgnain or Gwalwynne, who was King Arthur's sister's son, as attested by historians William of Malmesbury, and Robert of Gloucester. The name traces its roots to Normandy where Geoffry Wawein was listed there in 1198.

The Domesday Book lists the name as Walduinus in Staffordshire. [1] Later in 1205, Welwin was listed in Essex.

John Wallensis, Walensis or Galensis ( fl. 1215) was a Welsh canon lawyer who taught at Bologna, and wrote glosses and another John Wallensis or Waleys (fl. 1283), was a Franciscan, described as 'of Worcester' in a manuscript of his 'Summa Collectionum' at Peterhouse.

Thomas Wallensis or Gualensis (d. 1255), was a Welsh divine, Bishop of St. David's, former a canon of Lincoln in 1235. [2]

Important Dates for the Wollind family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wollind research. Another 140 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1389, 1336, 1342, 1343, 1379, 1600, 1681 and 1647 are included under the topic Early Wollind History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wollind Spelling Variations

Although there are comparatively few Welsh surnames, they have a great many spelling variations. Variations of Welsh names began almost immediately after their acceptance within Welsh society. In the Middle Ages, it was up to priests and the few other people that recorded names in official documents to decide how to spell the names that they heard. Variations that occurred because of improper recording increased dramatically as the names were later transliterated into English. The Brythonic Celtic language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, featured many highly inflected sounds that could not be properly captured by the English language. Spelling variations were, however, also carried out according to an individual's design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were all indicated by the particular variation of one's name. The spelling variations of the name Wollind have included Walwyn, Wallwyn, Wallin, Walwin and others.

Early Notables of the Wollind family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Richard Walwayn, High Sheriff of Herefordshire (1336-1342), John Walwayn, High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1343; John Walwayne, High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1379; Sir Malcolm Walwyn of Ledbury and William Walwyn (c. 1600-1681), an English...
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wollind Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wollind migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Wollind Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Wollind, British settler travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Queen Bee" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 10th January 1872 [3]
  • Mrs. Wollind, British settler travelling from Gravesend with 7 children aboard the ship "Queen Bee" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 10th January 1872 [3]

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Citations

  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
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