Sandercock History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Norman surname Sandercock is derived from the name Saunder, which is a pet form of the personal name Alexander. This name was originally derived from the Greek personal name Alexandros which literally means defender of men.

Early Origins of the Sandercock family

The surname Sandercock was first found in County Wicklow (Irish: Cill Mhantáin), known as the “last county,” created only in 1606, located on the East coast of Ireland, today part of the Greater Dublin Area, where they were granted lands by Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, for their assistance in the invasion of Ireland in 1172.

Early History of the Sandercock family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sandercock research. Another 131 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1555, 1530, 1581, 1683, 1620, 1695, 1648 and 1710 are included under the topic Early Sandercock History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Sandercock Spelling Variations

Medieval scribes and church officials spelled the names as they sounded, so a name was often spelled many different ways during the lifetime of a single person. The investigation of the origin of the name Sandercock revealed many spelling variations including Saunders, Sanders, Sawnders, Sainders, Saynders, Saunderrs, Sannders, Sanderrs, Saunder and many more.

Early Notables of the Sandercock family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family up to this time was Laurence Saunders, a preacher of Northamptonshire, burned at the stake on February 8, 1555 for his Protestant views. Nicholas Sanders or Sander (ca. 1530-1581), was an English controversialist and historian, one of the twelve children of William Sanders of Aston, one time High Sheriff...
Another 53 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sandercock Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Sandercock migration to the United States +

During the middle of the 19th century, Irish families often experienced extreme poverty and racial discrimination in their own homeland under English rule. Record numbers died of disease and starvation and many others, deciding against such a fate, boarded ships bound for North America. The largest influx of Irish settlers occurred with Great Potato Famine of the late 1840s. Unfortunately, many of those Irish that arrived in Canada or the United States still experienced economic and racial discrimination. Although often maligned, these Irish people were essential to the rapid development of these countries because they provided the cheap labor required for the many canals, roads, railways, and other projects required for strong national infrastructures. Eventually the Irish went on to make contributions in the less backbreaking and more intellectual arenas of commerce, education, and the arts. Research early immigration and passenger lists revealed many early immigrants bearing the name Sandercock:

Sandercock Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mr. S.L. Sandercock, (b. 1865), aged 21, Cornish merchant departing from Liverpool aboard the ship "Umbria" arriving in New York, USA on 5 April 1886 [1]
Sandercock Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Mr. Frederick Sandercock, (b. 1882), aged 21, Cornish labourer, from St Austell, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Ivernia" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 13th April 1903 en route to Greenland, Michigan, USA [2]
  • Mr. Nicholas Arthur Sandercock, (b. 1886), aged 19, Cornish gardener, from Truro, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Baltic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 19th May 1905 en route to Auburn, New York, USA [2]

Canada Sandercock migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sandercock Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • Miss Edith Sandercock, (b. 1879), aged 26, Cornish dressmaker travelling aboard the ship "Oceanic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York in 1905 en route to Clearwater, Manitoba, Canada [2]
  • Mr. William Sandercock, (b. 1868), aged 37, Canadian farmer returning from Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Oceanic" arriving at Ellis Island, New York in 1905 en route to Clearwater, Manitoba, Canada [2]

Australia Sandercock migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Sandercock Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Philip Sandercock, (b. 1809), aged 35, Cornish labourer travelling aboard the ship "Lord William Bentinck" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 22nd August 1844 [3]
  • Mrs. Mary Sandercock, (b. 1814), aged 30, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Lord William Bentinck" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 22nd August 1844 [3]
  • Miss Caroline Sandercock, (b. 1840), aged 4, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Lord William Bentinck" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 22nd August 1844 [3]
  • Miss Mary Ann Sandercock, (b. 1841), aged 3, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Lord William Bentinck" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 22nd August 1844 [3]
  • Miss Grace Sandercock, (b. 1844), aged 6 months, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Lord William Bentinck" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 22nd August 1844 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Sandercock Settlers in Australia in the 20th Century
  • Mr. Richard Sandercock, (b. 1886), aged 18, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "Wardha" arriving in Queensland, Australia on 14th June 1904 [4]

New Zealand Sandercock migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Sandercock Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. J. Sandercock, British settler travelling from Plymouth with family aboard the ship "Joseph Fletcher" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 19th March 1858 [5]
  • Mr. J. Sandercock, Jr., British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Joseph Fletcher" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 19th March 1858 [5]
  • Mr. Charles Sandercock, (b. 1854), aged 21, Cornish farm labourer departing on 12th October 1875 aboard the ship "Caroline" going to Napier, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand arriving in port on 31st January 1876 [6]
  • Charles Sandercock, aged 21, a farm labourer, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Caroline" in 1876

Contemporary Notables of the name Sandercock (post 1700) +

  • Robert Sandercock (b. 1963), English professional footballer
  • Graham Sandercock, English politician, author, journalist and former teacher
  • Leonie Sandercock (b. 1949), Australian academic
  • Philip John "Phil" Sandercock (b. 1953), English former professional footballer

HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Benjamin George Charles Sandercock, British Petty Officer Stoker, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [7]


The Sandercock Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nil Conscire Sibi
Motto Translation: Conscious of no Wrong.


  1. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to New York 1820 - 1891 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_new_york_1820_1891.pdf
  2. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_ellis_island_1892_on.pdf
  3. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  4. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_queensland.pdf
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  6. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to other ports, 1872 - 84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  7. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


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