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Wintringham History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Early Origins of the Wintringham family


The surname Wintringham was first found in Lincolnshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having prevailed over King Harold, granted most of Britain to his many victorious Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a Bishop, with 60 or more Lordships scattered throughout the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to distinguish him from the senior stem of the family. After many rebellious wars between his Barons, Duke William, commissioned a census of all England to determine in 1086, settling once and for all, who held which land. He called the census the Domesday Book, [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
indicating that those holders registered would hold the land until the end of time. Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Winteringham held Gilbert de Ghent who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086.

Early History of the Wintringham family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wintringham research.
Another 195 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1204, 1392, 1689, 1747 and 1745 are included under the topic Early Wintringham History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wintringham Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: Winteringham, Wintringham, Wintrincham, Winterinham, Wynteringham and many more.

Early Notables of the Wintringham family (pre 1700)


Another 22 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wintringham Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Wintringham family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wintringham Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Thomas Wintringham, aged 38, who landed in New York in 1812 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name Wintringham (post 1700)


  • Clifton Wintringham Jr. (1720-1794), English physician, joint military physician to the forces in 1756, a monument dedicated to his work is found in Westminster Abbey
  • Sir Clifton Wintringham (1712-1794), 1st Baronet of Dover Street, English physician and peer, Physician-in-Ordinary to George III
  • Tiny Wintringham, Australian homeless gentleman who after Gordon House, Victoria was torn down made so much fuss that the State Government decided to rebuild; eponym of Wintringham Specialist Aged Care
  • Margaret Wintringham (1879-1955), née Longbottom, a British Liberal Party politician, the second woman to take her seat in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom
  • Michael Charles Wintringham CNZM (b. 1947), New Zealand public servant, State Services Commissioner (1997-2004)
  • Thomas Wintringham (1867-1921), British Liberal Party politician, Member of Parliament for Louth (1920-1921)

The Wintringham Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortis esto non ferox
Motto Translation: Be brave, not ferocious.


Wintringham Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

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