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Whybird Early Origins



The surname Whybird was first found in Westmorland, where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Clifton Hall. However, there is one reference of a Wybert, who was Prior of Christ Church Cathedral Priory in Canterbury, attached to Canterbury Cathedral from 1153-1167. Their family records can prove an unbroken line resident at Clifton Hall since 1367. Before the acquisition of Clifton Hall through the marriage of William de Wybergh to Eleanor, daughter and heiress of Gilbert Engayne, the family of Wybergh held a family seat at St. Bees, a parish in which Whitehaven is situated. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
St. Bees or St. Bees Head on which there is a lighthouse, is said to have been founded by St. Bega, an Irish saint who founded a monastery there about 650 A.D.

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Whybird Spelling Variations


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Whybird Spelling Variations



Spelling variations of this family name include: Wybergh, Wyberg, Whyberg, Whybergh, Wyborough, Wyburgh, Whyburgh, Wyburg, Whyburg, Whybourg, Wybourgh, Wibergh, Wiberg, Wibourg, Wibourgh and many more.

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Whybird Early History


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Whybird Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whybird research. Another 209 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1663 and 1827 are included under the topic Early Whybird History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Whybird Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Whybird Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Whybird Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: Charles M. and John Wiberg who settled in New York State in 1834.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Hominem te esse memento
Motto Translation: Remember that thou art a man.


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Whybird Family Crest Products


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Whybird Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Other References

  1. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  2. Paul, Sir James Balfour. An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland Second Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1903. Print.
  3. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  4. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
  5. Fulton, Alexander. Scotland and Her Tartans: The Romantic Heritage of the Scottish Clans and Families. Godalming: Bramley, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-86283-880-0).
  6. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  7. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  8. Martine, Roddy, Roderick Martine and Don Pottinger. Scottish Clan and Family Names Their Arms, Origins and Tartans. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 1992. Print.
  9. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
  10. Skene, William Forbes Edition. Chronicles of the Picts, Chronicles of the Scots and Other Early Memorials of Scottish History. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1867. Print.
  11. ...

The Whybird Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Whybird Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 2 July 2015 at 12:13.

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