Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Weekes History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Weekes is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Weekes family lived in Sussex. The name, however, derives from the Old English word wic, which describes someone who lives at an outlying settlement.


Early Origins of the Weekes family


The surname Weekes was first found in Surrey at Wyke, a tything, in the parish of Worplesdon, union of Guildford, First division of the hundred of Woking. "This place is mentioned in Domesday Book under the name of Wucha, and at an early period was held by a family called De Wyke." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Another branch of the family was found at Yatton in Somerset. "The greater portion of [the church of Yatton] appears to have been rebuilt in the 15th century, by the Wyck family, to one of whom is a monument bearing his effigy, in the north transept." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Thomas de Wykes ( fl. 1258-1293), the English chronicler, took the habit of a canon regular at Osney Abbey, near Oxford, on 14 April 1282. "He mentions in his chronicle various namesakes and probable kinsfolk, including Robert de Wykes (d. 1246), Edith de Wyke (d. 1269), and John de Wykes, who in 1283 took a 'votum profectionis'. The name is a fairly common one, both as a personal and a place name, so that it is highly unsafe to identify him with other bearers of the same name, such as Thomas de Wyke, priest, who before 1249 wished to become a Franciscan friar." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


Early History of the Weekes family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Weekes research.
Another 158 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1086, 1703, 1222, 1293, 1430, 1554, 1554, 1554, 1621, 1593, 1643, 1627, 1641, 1628, 1699, 1632, 1707, 1683 and 1684 are included under the topic Early Weekes History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Weekes Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Weekes has been recorded under many different variations, including Weekes, Weeks, Wikes, Wykes, Wyke, Wix, Wicks, Weykes and many more.

Early Notables of the Weekes family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Thomas Wykes (1222-c.1293), English chronicler, a canon regular of Oseney Abbey, near Oxford; Thomas Wykes (died c.1430), Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire; Thomas Wykes (fl. 1554), of Moreton Jeffries, Herefordshire, an English politician, Member of the Parliament for Leominster in November 1554; Richard Wyche (or Wiche) (1554-1621), a...
Another 56 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Weekes Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Weekes family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Weekess were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Weekes Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Anna, Marie and Joe Weekes, who settled in New England in 1635
  • Thomas Weekes, who settled in Barbados in 1635
  • Anna Weekes, aged 1, who arrived in New England in 1635 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Francis Weekes, who arrived in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1635 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • George Weekes, who landed in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1635 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Weekes Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Dr. Weekes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Kenilworth" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 2nd May 1857 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mrs. Weekes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Kenilworth" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 2nd May 1857 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mr. Francis Weekes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Kenilworth" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 2nd May 1857 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mr. Weekes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Solent" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 30th July 1857 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • Mrs. Weekes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Solent" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 30th July 1857 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Weekes (post 1700)


  • James Weekes (b. 1911), American sailor and Olympic champion
  • Marie Weekes, American politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Nebraska 3rd District, 1920 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • John A. Weekes Jr., American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from New York County 25th District, 1898, 1900-02 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • B. P. Weekes, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kansas, 1936 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Augustus W. Weekes (1850-1916), American Republican politician, Member of Michigan State House of Representatives from Kent County 2nd District, 1893-96; Member of Michigan State Senate 17th District, 1901-04 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Henry Weekes RA (1807-1877), English sculptor, born at Canterbury; he held a studio in Buckingham Palace Road where he executed the statues of Sir Francis Bacon, for Trinity College, Cambridge; Lord Auckland, for Calcutta; Dr. Goodall, for Eton; John Hunter, for the Royal College of Surgeons and many more [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 30 Jan. 2019
  • William Weekes Fowler (1849-1923), English clergyman and entomologist
  • Paul Nicholas Weekes (b. 1969), English cricketer
  • William Weekes (d. 1806), Irish-born Canadian lawyer and political figure in Upper Canada
  • Elizabeth "Liz" Weekes (b. 1971), Australian Olympic water polo gold medal champion
  • ... (Another 5 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Weekes family



HMS Repulse

  • Mr. Albert James Weekes, British Boy, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [8]CITATION[CLOSE]
    HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html

The Weekes Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cari Deo nihilo carent
Motto Translation: Those dear to God want nothing.


Weekes Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  6. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  7. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 30 Jan. 2019
  8. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


Sign Up