Wallworth History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Wallworth arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Wallworth family lived in Surrey, at Walworth.

Early Origins of the Wallworth family

The surname Wallworth was first found in Surrey where they were Lords of the manor of Walworth from early times. At the time of the taking of the Domesday Book survey in 1086, Walworth was held by Baynard from the Archbishop of Canterbury, and conjecturally the Walworths are descended from this Baynard a Norman noble.

Sir William Walworth (d. 1385) was Lord May of London and "was descended of good family. A William de Walworth, who may have been his father, was the grantee of land in Darlington in 1314. Sir William himself succeeded a member of the ancient family of Bart, Bard, or Baard, in the tenure of a manor which included the parish of Middleton St. George, near Darlington in Durham." [1]

Early History of the Wallworth family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wallworth research. Another 72 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1373, 1380 and 1750 are included under the topic Early Wallworth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wallworth Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Wallworth, Wallworthe, Walworth, Walworthe, Woolworth, Woolworthe, Wolworth, Wolworthe, Walwork, Walworke, Wallwork and many more.

Early Notables of the Wallworth family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Wallworth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Wallworth migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Wallworth Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Hannah Wallworth, British Convict who was convicted in Liverpool, Merseyside, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Experiment" on 4th December 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [2]

New Zealand Wallworth migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Wallworth Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • W. Wallworth, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Lutterworth" in 1878

Contemporary Notables of the name Wallworth (post 1700) +

  • Joseph F. Wallworth (b. 1876), American Republican politician, Member of New Jersey State Senate from Camden County, 1921-23; Chair of Camden County Republican Party, 1925-27 [3]


  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 22nd March 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/coromandel-and-experiment
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, December 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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