Sucker History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Sucker family

The surname Sucker was first found in Lancashire at Ormskirk. The first record of the family was Thomas Such, who complained early in the reign of Elizabeth that certain of the inhabitants of Ormskirk had taken their corn to other mills. The entry continues: apparently there were complaints against the miller that the corn was not so well ground by him and that he took, or lost, an excessive proportion of the flour. In the end, Thomas Such built a new mill at the Knoll to help solve the issue. [1]

However, another source has a different point of origin for the family. This source claims the name was a Norman name appearing in the Roll of Battel Abbey. "All authorities are agreed in deriving this great house from the Sovereign Earls of Brittany ; but they differ materially as to the affinity it bore to the parent stock." [2]

"Alan La Zouche, the undoubted founder of the family, who in his charter to Lilleshall Priory styles himself ' son of Geoffrey le Vicomte,' lived in the time of Henry II., and acquired a great estate through his wife Alice, the heiress of the elder male line of De Belmeis. She brought him Ashby, since, as Ashby-de-la-Zouche, the head of his barony, in Leicestershire, Tong and other manors in Shropshire, and lands in Sussex and Devonshire. Their eldest son William commonly went by his mother's name; but when he died in 1199, he was succeeded by his brother Roger, who had always called himself La Zouche." [2]

North Molton, Devon was the site of another of the family. "The manor was part of the portion of Eadgytha, wife of the Confessor, and was given by John to Roger le Zouch. From the Zouches it passed to the St. Maurs. The church was given by Alan le Zouch, circa 1313, to the monastery of Lilleshull, in Shropshire." [3]

Early History of the Sucker family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sucker research. Another 134 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1394, 1415, 1420, 1703, 1607, 1634 and 1569 are included under the topic Early Sucker History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Sucker Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Zouch, Zouche, Souch, Souche and others.

Early Notables of the Sucker family (pre 1700)

Notable of this family during the Middle Ages was William Sutch, who in 1703 had given two closes called Long Hey and Little Hey in Aughton, Lancashire for the benefit of the poor. [1] "Edward Zouche the last Lord, was one of the peers who sat in judgment on Mary Queen of Scots at Fotheringay. Elizabeth afterwards sent him on an embassy to Scotland, and appointed him her Justiciary for North and South Wales : and he was Constable of Dover and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports under her successor. " He built the magnificent mansion of Bramhill, Hants, as a residence...
Another 163 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sucker Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Sucker migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sucker Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Sucker, who landed in Virginia in 1650 [4]
  • John Sucker, who arrived in Maryland in 1651 [4]
Sucker Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • August Sucker, who landed in Texas in 1854 [4]

Australia Sucker migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Sucker Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • William Sucker, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rajasthan" in 1838 [5]
  • Mr. Raspberry Hall Sucker, (Sucker, Roseberry Haw), English convict who was convicted in Durham, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Bangalore" on 28th March 1848, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) from Bermuda [6]


  1. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Worth, R.N., A History of Devonshire London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, E.G., 1895. Digital
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAJASTHAN 1838. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1838Rajasthan.htm
  6. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 15th September 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/bangalore


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate