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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The illustrious surname Stride is classified as a habitation surname, which was originally derived from a place-name, and is one form of surname belonging to a broader group called hereditary surnames. Habitation names were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. Topographic names, form the other broad category of surnames that was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree.

Other local names are derived from the names of houses, manors, estates, regions, and entire counties. As a general rule, the greater the distance between an individual and their homeland, the larger the territory they were named after. For example, a person who only moved to another parish would be known by the name of their original village, while people who migrated to a different country were often known by the name of a region or country from which they came. Stride is a place-name from in Stroud, a parish in Gloucester or from Strood, a parish in Kent.

Stride Early Origins



The surname Stride was first found in Somerset where they were descended from the Alain, the Duke of Bretagne who arrived in England with William the Conqueror in 1066 A.D. The first to be granted lands was Sir Warinus Strode, Lord of Strode in Dorset, whose lands also pervaded Somerset. The Devon branch were originally from Strode, in the parish of Ermington, where Adam de Strode the first recorded ancestor was seated in the reign of Henry III. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

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Stride Spelling Variations


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Stride Spelling Variations



Since the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules, Breton surnames have many spelling variations. Latin and French, which were the official court languages, were also influential on the spelling of surnames. The spelling of surnames was rarely consistent in medieval times, and scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules. Therefore, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings of their surname in the ancient chronicles. Moreover, a large number of foreign names were brought into England after the Norman Conquest, which accelerated and accentuated the alterations to the spelling of various surnames. The name has been spelled Strode, Stroud, Strowd, Stroude, Strowde and others.

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Stride Early History


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Stride Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stride research. Another 251 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1249, 1290, 1561, 1750, 1771, 1350, 1400, 1360, 1480, 1522, 1638, 1707, 1685, 1689, 1690, 1598, 1645, 1624, 1645, 1600, 1643, 1637, 1597, 1626, 1676, 1660, 1676, 1589 and 1666 are included under the topic Early Stride History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Stride Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Stride Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable of this family during the Middle Ages was Colonel Strode of Southhill; Ralph Strode ( fl. 1350-1400), an English schoolman, fellow of Merton College, Oxford, before 1360; Sir Richard Strode ( c. 1480-1522), English tinner and British Member of Parliament for Plympton Erle, Devon; and Richard Strode (1638-1707), British Member of Parliament...

Another 90 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Stride Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Stride, or a variant listed above:

Stride Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Joseph Stride, who landed in America in 1764

Stride Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Samuel Stride, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1808

Stride Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Herbert Edward Stride, aged 23, who settled in America, in 1903
  • Herbert Stride, aged 25, who landed in America from London, England, in 1908
  • Dorothy Edith Stride, aged 24, who landed in America from Southampton, England, in 1911
  • Annie Stride, aged 36, who emigrated to America from Southampton, England, in 1913
  • Anna Stride, aged 36, who emigrated to the United States from Southampton, England, in 1913
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Stride Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Samuel Stride, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750

Stride Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

  • Henry Stride, aged 23, who settled in Montreal, Canada, in 1923

Stride Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Hester Stride, aged 23, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Warren Hastings"

Stride Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • George Stride, aged 26, a labourer, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Rangitikei" in 1884

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Contemporary Notables of the name Stride (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Stride (post 1700)



  • David Stride (1958-2016), English professional footballer and manager; he played from 1978 to 1988 and managed Lymington Town Bashley in 2015
  • Darren Stride (b. 1975), English professional footballer
  • John Stride (b. 1936), English actor best known for his television work during the 1970s
  • Virginia Stride, British actress

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Stride Historic Events


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Stride Historic Events




HMAS Sydney II

  • Mr. Cecil Meadus Stride (1920-1941), Australian Stoker 2nd Class from Hurstville, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II on the 19th November 1941 and died during the sinking

HMS Prince of Wales

  • Mr. J Stride, British Petty Officer Cook, who sailed in to battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Hyeme viresco
Motto Translation: I flourish (or am green) in winter.


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Stride Family Crest Products


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Stride Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Other References

  1. Elster, Robert J. International Who's Who. London: Europa/Routledge. Print.
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  4. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  5. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  7. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  8. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  9. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  10. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  11. ...

The Stride Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Stride Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 15 July 2016 at 12:04.

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