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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Shugborough arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Shugborough family lived in Warwickshire which is derived from the Old English word scucca, meaning goblin or demon, and burgh meaning hill. Combined the place meant "hill or mound haunted by an evil spirit." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
The place name was listed as Socheberge [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Shugborough Early Origins



The surname Shugborough was first found in Warwickshire at Upper Shuckburgh, a parish, in the union of Southam, Southam division of the hundred of Knightlow. "Shuckburgh Park, the seat of the ancient family of Shuckburgh. Dugdale supposes that William de Shuckburgh, in the time of King John, was the first who assumed the name; in subsequent reigns several of the family held offices of great trust and authority in the county. The mansion is a spacious and elegant structure, in an extensive park, abounding in deer, but whose woodland recesses do not possess their former beauty, much of the timber having been felled." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Prior to the year 1200, their history is obscured but most assume it to be descended from Herlwin, the Domesday tenant of Shuckburgh who held the manor from the Count of Meulan in the year 1086 or from Alwin, the tenant of the other half who held it from Thorkell of Warwick. The Shuckburgh family have held the manor ever since. Today, Shuckburgh Hall is a privately owned country house mansion and has been the home of the Shuckburgh family since the 12th century. "William de Suckberge is presumed to be the first who assumed the name, from Shuckborough Superior, in this county; he was living in the third of John." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

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Shugborough Spelling Variations


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Shugborough Spelling Variations



A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Shuckburgh, Shuckborough, Shuckburg, Shuckberg and others.

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Shugborough Early History


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Shugborough Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Shugborough research. Another 263 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1210, 1160, 1650 and 1656 are included under the topic Early Shugborough History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Shugborough Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Shugborough Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Shugborough Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Shugborough or a variant listed above: Richard Shuchburgh settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1768.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Haec manus ob patriam
Motto Translation: This hand for my country.


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Shugborough Family Crest Products


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Shugborough Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Other References

  1. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  2. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  3. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  4. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  5. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  7. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  8. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  9. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  10. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  11. ...

The Shugborough Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Shugborough Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 12 February 2016 at 08:52.

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