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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2015

Where did the English Seavey family come from? What is the English Seavey family crest and coat of arms? When did the Seavey family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Seavey family history?

The lineage of the name Seavey begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It is a result of when they lived in the county of Worcester. Seavey is a topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. During the Middle Ages, as society became more complex, individuals needed a way to be distinguishable from others. Toponymic surnames were developed as a result of this need. Various features in the landscape or area were used to distinguish people from one another. In this case the original bearers of the surname Seavey were named due to their close proximity to the river Severn.


Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Seavey has undergone many spelling variations, including Severne, Severn, Seven, Sevens, Severin, Seffern, Sefferin and many more.

First found in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Seavey research. Another 247 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1300 and 1675 are included under the topic Early Seavey History in all our PDF Extended History products.


More information is included under the topic Early Seavey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.


To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Seavey were among those contributors:

Seavey Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • William Seavey, who landed in Portsmouth, NH in 1631

Seavey Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Francis A Seavey, aged 30, landed in New York in 1812
  • T Seavey, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851
  • E. A. Seavey, aged 30, who landed in America, in 1896
  • Fred H. Seavey, aged 42, who settled in America, in 1896

Seavey Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Ella Seavey, aged 2, who landed in America, in 1903
  • Elizabeth Seavey, aged 40, who emigrated to the United States, in 1907
  • Arthur Seavey, aged 18, who emigrated to the United States, in 1909
  • E. M. Seavey, aged 23, who emigrated to America, in 1919
  • Galen F. Seavey, aged 21, who landed in America, in 1919


  • Clyde Follet Seavey (1904-1991), American artist
  • Mitch Seavey, American dog musher, winner of the 1,112-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race across the U.S. state of Alaska in 2004
  • Dan "Roaring Dan" Seavey (1867-1949), American notorious pirate on the Great Lakes in the early 20th century


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtus praestantior auro
Motto Translation: Virtue is more excellent than gold.


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  1. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  2. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  3. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  4. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  5. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  6. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  7. Sanders, Joanne McRee Edition. English Settlers in Barbados 1637-1800. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  8. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  9. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  10. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  11. ...

The Seavey Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Seavey Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 February 2014 at 20:08.

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