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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


The Ryley surname originally appeared in Gaelic as O Raghailligh, which means descendant of Raghallach.

Ryley Early Origins



The surname Ryley was first found in County Cavan. They were known as the Princes of East Breffny, descended from Raghallaigh, Prince of Breffny in 981. They maintained their territory during the Anglo/ Norman invasion of Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, in 1172, but Sir John O'Reilly, Prince of Breffny surrendered the principality to Queen Elizabeth I thereby ensuring that his territories remained intact.

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Ryley Spelling Variations


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Ryley Spelling Variations



The Middle Ages saw a great number of spelling variations for surnames common to the Irish landscape. One reason for these variations is the fact that surnames were not rigidly fixed by this period. The following variations for the name Ryley were encountered in the archives: O'Reilly, O'Reilley, O'Reily, O'Rielly, O'Riely, O'Riley, O'Rilley, Reel and many more.

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Ryley Early History


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Ryley Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ryley research. Another 189 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1598, 1669, 1630, 1695, 1689, 1640, 1703, 1689, 1646 and 1691 are included under the topic Early Ryley History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Ryley Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Ryley Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable amongst the family name at this time was Count John O'Reilly; Edmund O'Reilly (1598-1669), Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh; Hugh Reily (Reilly or O’Reilly) (c.1630-1695) Irish Member of Parliament for Cavan Borough in the Patriot...

Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ryley Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



In the 19th century, thousands of Irish left their English-occupied homeland for North Ameri ca. Like most new world settlers, the Irish initially settled on the eastern shores of the continent but began to move westward with the promise of owning land. The height of this Irish migration came during the Great Potato Famine of the late 1840s. With apparently nothing to lose, Irish people left on ships bound for North America and Australia. Unfortunately a great many of these passengers lost their lives - the only thing many had left - to disease, starvation, and accidents during the long and dangerous journey. Those who did safely arrive in "the land of opportunities" were often used for the hard labor of building railroads, coal mines, bridges, and canals. The Irish were critical to the quick development of the infrastructure of the United States and Canada. Passenger and immigration lists indicate that members of the Ryley family came to North America quite early:

Ryley Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Ann Ryley, who arrived in Virginia in 1653
  • Anne Ryley, who landed in Virginia in 1653
  • Dina Ryley, who arrived in Maryland in 1662
  • Thomas Ryley, who arrived in Maryland in 1665
  • Richard Ryley, who landed in Maryland in 1668

Ryley Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Edmund Ryley, who landed in Virginia in 1712
  • Margaret Ryley, who landed in Virginia in 1714

Ryley Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • David Ryley, who landed in America in 1811
  • Edward Ryley, aged 45, arrived in New York in 1812
  • Phillip Ryley, aged 19, arrived in New York in 1849
  • Daniel Ryley, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851

Ryley Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Thomas Ryley, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on September 21, 1826, settling in New South Wales, Australia [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1826 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1826
  • Adam Ryley, English convict from Chester, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on May 29, 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 24) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1828 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1828
  • Samuel Ryley arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Childe Harold" in 1849

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Ryley Family Crest Products


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Ryley Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1826 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1826
  2. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 24) Albion voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1828 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1828

Other References

  1. Vicars, Sir Arthur. Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Harris, Ruth-Ann and B. Emer O'Keefe. The Search for Missing Friends Irish Immigrant Advertisements Placed in the Boston Pilot Volume II 1851-1853. Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1991. Print.
  4. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  5. Woodham-Smith, Cecil. The Great Hunger Ireland 1845-1849. New York: Old Town Books, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-385-3).
  6. Donovan, George Francis. The Pre-Revolutionary Irish in Massachusetts 1620-1775. Menasha, WI: Geroge Banta Publsihing Co., 1932. Print.
  7. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  8. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  9. Rasmussen, Louis J. . San Francisco Ship Passenger Lists 4 Volumes Colma, California 1965 Reprint. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1978. Print.
  10. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  11. ...

The Ryley Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Ryley Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 20 April 2016 at 10:13.

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