Pickup History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient history of the Pickup name begins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the family resided in Pickup or Pickup Bank in Lancashire. This place-name was originally derived from the Old English word Pic-copp which referred to those individuals who lived on a hill with a sharp peak.

Early Origins of the Pickup family

The surname Pickup was first found in Lancashire where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Pickup family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Pickup research. Another 89 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Pickup History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Pickup Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Pickup include Pickup, Pickupp, Pickopp, Pickop, Picup and others.

Early Notables of the Pickup family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Pickup Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Pickup migration to the United States +

Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Pickup or a variant listed above:

Pickup Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James, Joseph and William Pickup, who all, who settled in Philadelphia between 1853 and 1868
Pickup Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Walter J. Pickup, aged 34, who arrived in New York, N. Y. in 1919 aboard the ship "Cubadist" from Tuxpam, Mexico [1]
  • Herbert Pickup, aged 17, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Saxonia" from Liverpool, England [2]
  • Walter J. Pickup, aged 24, who arrived in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Cubadist" from Tuxpam, Mexico [3]
  • John Alfred Pickup, aged 22, originally from Blackburn, England, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Lapland" from Liverpool, England [4]
  • Maggie Pickup, aged 24, originally from Blackburn, England, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Lapland" from Liverpool, England [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Pickup migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Pickup Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • James Pickup, aged 38, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dunedin" in 1875 [6]
  • Mary Pickup, aged 32, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Dunedin" in 1875 [6]

Contemporary Notables of the name Pickup (post 1700) +

  • Ernest Alexander Pickup (1887-1970), American printmaker
  • Clarence William Pickup (1897-1974), American outfielder in Major League Baseball
  • Ronald Alfred Pickup (1940-2021), English actor from Chester, who was active in television, film, and theatre, known for his 1964 appearance in Doctor Who for which he was paid £30
  • Timothy Alexander "Tim" Pickup (1948-2021), Australian Rugby League footballer who played 99 matches from 1970 to 1979
  • Samuel Walter Willet Pickup (1859-1935), Canadian farmer, merchant, shipbuilder, shipowner, and politician
  • Rachel Pickup (b. 1973), British theatre, television and film actress

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. George William  Pickup (1875-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the Halifax Explosion (1917) [7]
Ibrox disaster
  • Nigel Patrick Pickup (1962-1971), Scottish football supporter, from Liverpool who was at the Ibrox disaster on 2nd January 1971 when a human crush among the crowd killed 66 and injured 200 people he died of his injuries [8]
SS Caribou
  • Mr. H. J. Pickup, British passenger who was Royal Navy seaman was travelling aboard the railway ferry "SS Caribou" when it was struck by a German submarine torpedo on 14th October 1942, the most significant sinking in Canadian waters at that time, he survived the sinking


The Pickup Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Candide et constanter
Motto Translation: Candid and steady.


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6QZ-L46 : 6 December 2014), Walter J. Pickup, 22 Jan 1919; citing departure port Tuxpam, Mexico, arrival port New York, N. Y., ship name Cubadist, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6QF-34S : 6 December 2014), Herbert Pickup, 07 Feb 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Saxonia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6QJ-Z6R : 6 December 2014), Walter J. Pickup, 15 Feb 1919; citing departure port Tuxpam, Mexico, arrival port New York City, New York, New York, ship name Cubadist, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J67T-WMV : 6 December 2014), John Alfred Pickup, 11 Jun 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Lapland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J67T-WMK : 6 December 2014), Maggie Pickup, 11 Jun 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Lapland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 9th November 2011). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  7. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  8. ^ Bradford City Football Club In memory (retrieved 22nd March 2021). Retrieved from https://www.bradfordcityafc.com/club/in-memoriam/


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