Ogilvy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Ogilvy surname is a habitational name from a place near Glamis, in county of Angus (present day region of Tayside), which is first recorded c.1205 in the form Ogilvin. The root of the place name is thought to be from the Welsh "uchel," meaning "high."

Early Origins of the Ogilvy family

The surname Ogilvy was first found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where Gilbert, son of Gillebride, 1st Earl of Angus, obtained a charter of the lands of Purin, Ogguluin and Kynmethan, in Angus between 1172 and 1177. Gilbert is also on record as a witness of a grant of the church of Monyfode to the Abbey of Arbroath by his brother, Gilchrist, 3rd Earl of Angys between 1201-04. There is also early record of an Alexander de Oggoluin, who had a Charter of the lands of Belauht around 1232. Patrick Oggelville or Eggilvyn (of county Forfar) swore an oath of allegiance to King Edward the 1st of England in 1296.

Early History of the Ogilvy family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ogilvy research. Another 445 words (32 lines of text) covering the years 1320, 1425, 1430, 1491, 1579, 1615, 1639, 1645, 1651, 1652, 1679, 1701, 1707, 1715, 1745, 1778, and 1826 are included under the topic Early Ogilvy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ogilvy Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Ogilvie, Ogilvy, Oguilvie, Ogilby, Ogleby and many more.

Early Notables of the Ogilvy family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan at this time was Saint John Ogilvie (1579-1615), a Jesuit priest, and a cadet of Ogilvy of Findlater, who was arrested and hanged at Glasgow Cross for his defense of the spiritual supremacy of the papacy. He was beatified...
Another 43 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ogilvy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Ogilvy migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Ogilvy Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • James Ogilvy, who arrived in Virginia in 1666
Ogilvy Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Henry Ogilvy, who settled in St. Kitts in 1716
  • George Ogilvy, who arrived in Maryland in 1756
  • Alexander Ogilvy, who landed in America in 1790 [1]

Australia Ogilvy migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Ogilvy Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • James Ogilvy, aged 33, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Telegraph"

New Zealand Ogilvy migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Ogilvy Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mrs. Ann Ogilvy, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sandford" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th July 1856 [2]
  • Mr. Walter Ogilvy, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sandford" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th July 1856 [2]

Contemporary Notables of the name Ogilvy (post 1700) +

  • Lyman Ogilvy, American Bishop
  • David Ogilvy (1893-1968), 12th Earl of Airlie, Scottish peer, Lord Chamberlain of Britain (1937-1965) and (1936-1967)
  • David Ogilvy (1856-1900), 11th Earl of Airlie, Scottish soldier and representative peer
  • David Ogilvy (1826-1881), 10th Earl of Airlie, Scottish representative peer
  • David Ogilvy (1785-1849), 9th Earl of Airlie, Scottish representative peer, Lord Lieutenant of Angus (1826-1849)
  • Bernard James "Bernie" Ogilvy, New Zealand educator and politician
  • Princess Alexandra Ogilvy (b. 1936), member of the British Royal Family, 33rd in the line of succession to the British throne
  • Sir Angus James Bruce Ogilvy (1928-2004), British businessman, best known as the husband of Princess Alexandra of Kent, a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II
  • David MacKenzie Ogilvy (1911-1999), Scottish (English born) advertising executive, known as "The Father of Advertising"
  • David George Patrick Coke Ogilvy (b. 1926), 13th Earl of Airlie, Lord Chamberlain of Britain (1984-1997)


The Ogilvy Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Tout jour
Motto Translation: To the end


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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