Neave History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Neave surname is derived from a place called Nevay in Angus.

Early Origins of the Neave family

The surname Neave was first found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), in the territorial origin from Nevay, a former parish now united to Essie. [1]

"In 1219 Adam de Neveth was present at the perambulation of the bounds between the lands of the Abbey of Arbroath and the barony of Kinblethmont. Alexander de Neve, a Scots prisoner of war in England, had a safe conduct to return to Scotland in 1422. Thomas Nevay who witnessed the transumpt of a charter in 1450 is doubtless the Thomas Neiff, chaplain in Brechin in 1453." [2]

Early History of the Neave family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Neave research. Another 256 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1219, 1453, 1511, 1558, 1637, 1579, 1597, 1647, 1666, 1792, 1870, 1850, 1870, 1672, 1792, 1870 and 1792 are included under the topic Early Neave History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Neave Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Nevay, Neave, Neaves, Nevey, Neve, Neevey and others.

Early Notables of the Neave family (pre 1700)

Notable among the family at this time was John Nevay (died 1672), a Scottish Covenanter who after the Resortaion was banished by the privy council to Holland. John Nevay (1792-1870) the Scottish poet, was born in Forfar on 28 January 1792, the...
Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Neave Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Neave migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Neave Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Neave, who settled in Virginia in 1630
  • Margaret Neave, who arrived at Boston in 1637
  • Margrett Neave, aged 58, who arrived in New England in 1637 [3]
  • Mrs. Margaret Neave, (b. 1579), aged 58, British settler travelling with the Paine family from Wrentham, Suffolk departing May 1637 from England aboard the ship "Mary Ann" arriving in Boston, Massachusetts, United States on 20 June 1637, heading for Salem [4]
  • Miss Margrett Neave, (b. 1579), aged 58, British settler from Yarmouth traveling aboard the ship "Mary Anne" arriving in New England in 1637 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Neave Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Alexander Neave, who settled in Maryland in 1716
  • Alexander Neave, who landed in Maryland in 1716 [3]
  • Joel Neave, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1742 [3]

New Zealand Neave migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Neave Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Andrew Neave, aged 29, a carpenter, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864
  • Margaret Neave, aged 25, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864
  • David Neave, aged 9 mths., who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864
  • Mrs. Marjory Neave, (b. 1840), aged 35, Scottish settler from Dundee travelling from London aboard the ship "Waimate" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 4th December 1875 [6]
  • Mr. John Neave, (b. 1868), aged 7, Scottish settler from Dundee travelling from London aboard the ship "Waimate" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 4th December 1875 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Neave (post 1700) +

  • Samuel R. Neave, American politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Maryland 5th District, 1902 [7]
  • David Neave (b. 1833), Scottish footballer who played from 1904 to 1912
  • Charles Neave (1800-1876), also known as Lord Neaves, was a Scottish theologian, judge and writer
  • Sheffield Neave (1799-1868), English merchant and Governor of the Bank of England from 1857 to 1859, son of Sir Thomas Neave, 2nd Baronet
  • Mark Neave (b. 1980), English cricketer
  • Sheffield Airey Neave CMG OBE (1879-1961), British naturalist and entomologist
  • Marcia Ann Neave AO (b. 1944), Australian legal academic and jurist, Judge of the Court of Appeal (2006-2014)
  • Guy Richard Neave (b. 1941), British social scientist and Emeritus Professor of Comparative Higher Education Policy Studies at the University of Twente
  • George D. "Geordie" Neave (1895-1986), English footballer who made 29 appearances Lincoln City as a centre half
  • Elizabeth Rachael Neave (b. 1987), British three-time gold, two-time silver and four-time bronze medalist slalom canoeist
  • ... (Another 11 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Hood
  • Mr. Peter F A Neave (b. 1922), English Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Battersea, London, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [8]


The Neave Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sola proba quae honestas
Motto Translation: Those things only are good which are honorable.


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Passengers of the Mary Anne of Yarmouth (Retrieved 18th November 2020). Retrieved from http://www.angelfire.com/mi4/polcrt/MaryAnne.html
  5. ^ Pilgrim Ship's of 1600's (Retrieved October 5th 2021, retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  6. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  7. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 10) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  8. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm


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