Mountfitchet History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the Mountfitchet family name begins after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They lived in "Monfichet, or Montfiquet, in the arrondissement of Bayeaux, said to be so named from their Scandinavian ancestor. " [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Mountfitchet family

The surname Mountfitchet was first found in Essex at Stansted Mountfitchet, a village and civil parish in the union of Bishop-Stortford that dates back to the Domesday Book when it was listed as Stanesteda.

By c.1290, the village was known as Stansted Mounfichet from the Muntfichet (Montfitchet) family who resided there since the 12th century. [3]

However, other records date back further revealing Robert Gernon Montfitchet holding lands there at the time of the Conquest that included a castle, of which there are still some remains. Another source claims the name is "descended from Robert Gernon, a great tenant in [the] Domesday [Book]. His son, according to Morant, took this name from the castle of Stanstead, county Essex, from the raised mount which he there constructed. " [2]

"The castle of Montfichet long remained, as well as the Church of St. Catherine in the castle, a foundation of this family. About 1050 Robert, surnamed Guernon (moustache), Baron of Montfichet, witnessed a charter of Duke William (Gall. Christ. xi. Instr. 229). He had issue, 1, William de Montfichet, who d. s. p., when the barony devolved on Wil­liam, the son of his brother; 2, Robert Guernon or Gernon, who held a great barony in Essex, &c., 1086. From his elder son William de Montfichet descended the Barons of that name, whose seats were at Stanstead Montfichet, Essex, and Montfichet Tower, London, of which city the Montfichets were hereditary standard-bearers or military chiefs in time of war. The younger branches retained the name of Gernon. Alured Gernon, brother of William de Montfichet, had estates in Essex and Middlesex 1130 (Rot. Pip.). Matthew, his son, 1135 witnessed a charter of William Montfichet (Mon. i. 803). Ralph, his son, 1165, held a fief from Montfichet in Essex, and was granted Bakewell, Derbyshire, by Richard I." [1]

Early History of the Mountfitchet family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mountfitchet research. Another 181 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1214, 1296, 1312, 1557, 1542, 1544, 1542, 1543, 1556, 1556 and 1557 are included under the topic Early Mountfitchet History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mountfitchet Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Muschat, Muschet, Montfichett, Montfiquet and many more.

Early Notables of the Mountfitchet family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Mitch (fl. 1557), English lawyer, of an Essex family, educated at Cambridge (B.A. 1542, M.A. 1544). He was admitted a fellow of St. John's College 14 March 1542-1543, but subsequently removed to Trinity Hall. Mitch was an active opponent at Cambridge of the growth of the reformed religion. "In 1556 Mitch was one of the examiners of John Hullier, preacher, of Lynn...
Another 71 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mountfitchet Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mountfitchet family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Mountfitchet or a variant listed above were: George Muschcat, who settled in Philadelphia in 1774; Martin Muscheck settled in Philadelphia in 1867; John Fitchett settled in Virginia in 1635; William and Rebecca Fitchett settled in Philadelphia in 1773..



  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


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