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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Monkus reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Monkus family lived in Northumberland. Monkhouse is one of several names that find their roots in the Anglo-Saxon terms munec, meaning monk, and hus, meaning house. It may be either local or occupational in origin, signifying worker at the monk's house in some instances and dweller at the monk's house in others. The surname may have also been used to identify one who hailed from any of several places in England called Monkhouse. In some cases the name may also be an Alglicized version of the Norman local surname Monceaux.

Monkus Early Origins



The surname Monkus was first found in Northumberland where they held a family seat from very early times and the name was thought to exist prior to the invasion of the Normans and the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

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Monkus Spelling Variations


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Monkus Spelling Variations



Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Monkus family name include Monkhouse, Monckhouse, Monkhowse and others.

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Monkus Early History


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Monkus Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Monkus research. Another 183 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 129 and 1290 are included under the topic Early Monkus History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Monkus Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Monkus Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Monkus Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Monkus family to immigrate North America: Jane Monkhouse, who arrived in Virginia in 1765; Wm. Monkhouse, who came to Philadelphia in 1805; and James Monkhouse, who came to San Francisco in 1851..

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Monachus Salvabor
Motto Translation: A monk (house) shall be saved.


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Monkus Family Crest Products


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Monkus Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    2. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
    3. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
    4. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
    5. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
    6. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    7. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    8. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
    9. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
    10. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
    11. ...

    The Monkus Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Monkus Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 7 November 2014 at 10:48.

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