Moher History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Moher comes from the Gaelic O Mochair.

Early Origins of the Moher family

The surname Moher was first found in Counties Waterford and Cork (Irish: Corcaigh) the ancient Kingdom of Deis Muin (Desmond), located on the southwest coast of Ireland in the province of Munster.

Early History of the Moher family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Moher research. Another 64 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1659, 1851, and 1853 are included under the topic Early Moher History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Moher Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Moher, O'Moher, Mohir, O'Mohir, Mogher and others.

Early Notables of the Moher family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Moher Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Moher migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Moher Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Moher, who was naturalized in Indiana between 1845 and 1852
  • Patrick and Thomas Moher, who were naturalized in New Orleans between 1846 and 1856
  • David Moher, who arrived in Boston in 1849 as a bonded passenger
  • Joseph Moher, who was naturalized in Pennsylvania in 1857
  • Patrick, Charles, and Johana Moher, who, who arrived in New York in 1866
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Moher migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Moher Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Moher, (b. 1838), aged 36, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Wennington" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 18th May 1875 [1]
  • Mrs. Caroline Moher, (b. 1842), aged 32, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Wennington" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 18th May 1875 [1]
  • Mr. Frederick Moher, (b. 1863), aged 11, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Wennington" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 18th May 1875 [1]
  • Miss Annie Moher, (b. 1872), aged 2, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Wennington" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 18th May 1875 [1]
  • Mr. George Moher, (b. 1840), aged 34, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Wennington" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 18th May 1875 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Moher (post 1700) +

  • Gayle Moher, American professional female bodybuilder
  • Thomas Casey Moher, American politician, Delegate to New Hampshire State Constitutional Convention from Dover 4th Ward, 1948 [2]
  • J. H. Moher, American Democrat politician, Member of Michigan Democratic State Central Committee, 1919; Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1920 [2]
  • John W. Moher (1909-1985), Irish Fianna Fáil politician, auctioneer and farmer
  • Mike Moher (b. 1962), retired Canadian NHL ice hockey right winger who played from 1982 to 1984
  • Frank Moher (b. 1955), Canadian playwright, director, and journalist, a finalist for the Governor General's Award
  • Mark Moher, Canadian ambassador to the United Nations for Disarmament


The Moher Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Conlan-a-bu
Motto Translation: Conlan forever.


  1. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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