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McTuggord History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Picts were the ancient Scottish tribe where the ancestors of the McTuggord family lived. The name McTuggord comes from the Gaelic name Mac an t-Sagairt, which means "son of the priest." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


Early Origins of the McTuggord family


The surname McTuggord was first found in Ross-shire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rois) a former county, now part of the Council Areas of Highland and Western Isles in Northern Scotland, which emerged from the Gaelic lordship of the Earl of Ross. One of the first on record was Ferchar, son of the Red Priest of Applecross in Ross. He was knighted by King Alexander of Scotland in 1215 for his assistance in subduing the rebellious clans of Moray. He eventually became the Earl of Ross. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

The Chronicle of Melrose noted: "Machentagar attacked them and mightily overthrew the king's enemies; and he cut off their heads and presented them as gifts to the new king ... And because of this, the lord king appointed him a new knight."

Fearchar of Ross or Ferchar mac in tSagairt (anglicized as Farquhar MacTaggart), was the first of the Scottish Ó Beólláin (O'Beolan, Beolan) family who received by Royal Grant the lands and Title of Mormaer or Earl of Ross (1223-1251.)


Early History of the McTuggord family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McTuggord research.
Another 143 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1459, 1504, 1527, 1581, 1583, 1688, 1789, 1867, 1835, 1857, 1841 and 1938 are included under the topic Early McTuggord History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McTuggord Spelling Variations


Before the first dictionaries appeared in the last few hundred years, scribes spelled according to sound. spelling variations are common among Scottish names. McTuggord has been spelled MacTaggart, MacTagart, MacIntaggart, MacTuggart, MacToggart and many more.

Early Notables of the McTuggord family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the Clan at this time was Sir John McTaggart, 1st Baronet (1789-1867), a Scottish Liberal MP in the British Parliament who represented Wigtown Burghs (1835-1857) and was created a Baronet in 1841. The...
Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McTuggord Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McTuggord family to the New World and Oceana


In those unstable times, many had no choice but to leave their beloved homelands. Sickness and poverty hounded travelers to North America, but those who made it were welcomed with land and opportunity. These settlers gave the young nations of Canada and the United States a strong backbone as they stood up for their beliefs as United Empire Loyalists and in the American War of Independence. In this century, the ancestors of these brave Scots have begun to recover their illustrious heritage through Clan societies and other heritage organizations. Early passenger and immigration lists reveal many Scottish settlers bearing the name McTuggord: Hugh, James, Mathew, Peter McTaggart, who all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860; as well as Charles, Hugh, James, Thomas and William McTaggert, who all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860..

The McTuggord Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ratione non vi
Motto Translation: By reason, not by force.


McTuggord Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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