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MacKinder History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Picts, an ancient Scottish tribe, were the ancestors of the first person to use the name MacKinder. It was a name for a pilgrim from the Gaelic word deoradh. The deoradh kept the relics of saints. The family have been the hereditary custodians of St. Fillan's Crozier. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


Early Origins of the MacKinder family


The surname MacKinder was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland. Dewarton is a village, in the parish of Borthwick, county of Edinburgh. It is here that the Dewar family have held the estate of Vogrie since early times. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the MacKinder family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our MacKinder research.
Another 122 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1296 and 1296 are included under the topic Early MacKinder History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

MacKinder Spelling Variations


Repeated and inaccurate translation of Scottish names from Gaelic to English and back resulted in a wide variety of spelling variations with single names. MacKinder has appeared Dewar, Dure, Dewyer, Dewer, McIndeor, McJarrow and many more.

Early Notables of the MacKinder family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early MacKinder Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the MacKinder family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

MacKinder Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • John MacKinder, aged 35, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Halcione" in 1875
  • Sarah E. MacKinder, aged 29, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Halcione" in 1875
  • John William MacKinder, aged 7, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Halcione" in 1875
  • Thomas U. MacKinder, aged 3, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Halcione" in 1875

Contemporary Notables of the name MacKinder (post 1700)


  • Douglas J. Mackinder, American Republican politician, Candidate in primary for Delegate to Michigan State Constitutional Convention from Van Buren County, 1961 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • William Mackinder (1880-1930), British Labour Party politician, Member of Parliament for Shipley (1923-1930)
  • Sir Halford John Mackinder (1861-1947), English geographer and politician, Director of the London School of Economics, eponym of the Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, St Peter's College, University of Oxford

The MacKinder Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quid non pro patria
Motto Translation: What would not one do for his country.


MacKinder Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 7) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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