Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Loyless History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The surname Loyless is derived from the Old English word "laweles," which means "lawless" and is ultimately derived from the Old English word "laghles," which means "outlaw." As a surname, Loyless came from a nickname for a person who was an outlaw, or was uncontrolled or unrestrained. The Gaelic form of the surname Loyless is Laighléis.


Early Origins of the Loyless family


The surname Loyless was first found in Glamorganshire (Welsh: Sir Forgannwg), a region of South Wales, anciently part of the Welsh kingdom of Glywysing, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Early History of the Loyless family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Loyless research.
Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1599, 1564, 1634, 1610, 1626, 1616, 1670, 1618, 1657, 1641, 1693, 1735, 1799, 1789, 1621 and 1675 are included under the topic Early Loyless History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Loyless Spelling Variations


Church officials and medieval scribes spelled names as they sounded; therefore, single person, could have his name spelt many different ways during their lifetime. While investigating the origins of the name Loyless, many spelling variations were encountered, including: Lawless, Lovelace, Lovelass, Loveless and others.

Early Notables of the Loyless family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family up to this time was Richard Lovelace, 1st Baron Lovelace (1564-1634), of Hurley in the County of Berkshire, English MP and peer, High Sheriff of Berkshire (1610) and High Sheriff of Oxfordshire (1626); John Lovelace, 2nd Baron Lovelace (1616-1670), British peer; Richard Lovelace (1618-1657), an English poet...
Another 52 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Loyless Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Loyless family to the New World and Oceana


A great number of Irish families left their homeland in the late 18th century and throughout the 19th century, migrating to such far away lands as Australia and North America. The early settlers left after much planning and deliberation. They were generally well off but they desired a tract of land that they could farm solely for themselves. The great mass of immigrants to arrive on North American shores in the 1840s differed greatly from their predecessors because many of them were utterly destitute, selling all they had to gain a passage on a ship or having their way paid by a philanthropic society. These Irish people were trying to escape the aftermath of the Great Potato Famine: poverty, starvation, disease, and, for many, ultimately death. Those that arrived on North American shores were not warmly welcomed by the established population, but they were vital to the rapid development of the industry, agriculture, and infrastructure of the infant nations of the United States and what would become Canada. Early passenger and immigration lists reveal many Irish settlers bearing the name Loyless:

Loyless Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Margaret Loyless, aged 35, who arrived in New York in 1911 aboard the ship "Florizel" from St. John's, Newfoundland [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJG3-76J : 6 December 2014), Margaret Loyless, 15 Sep 1911; citing departure port St. John's, Newfoundland, arrival port New York, ship name Florizel, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Donald A. Loyless, who arrived in New York in 1911 aboard the ship "Minneapolis" from London, England [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJGL-528 : 6 December 2014), Donald A. Loyless, 23 Oct 1911; citing departure port London, arrival port New York, ship name Minneapolis, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Augustus Loyless, who arrived in New York in 1911 aboard the ship "Minneapolis" from London, England [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJGL-526 : 6 December 2014), Augustus Loyless, 23 Oct 1911; citing departure port London, arrival port New York, ship name Minneapolis, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • John Loyless, aged 48, who arrived in New York City, New York, New york in 1917 aboard the ship "Anglo Mexican" from Bordeau [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJCH-L3X : 6 December 2014), John Loyless, 25 May 1917; citing departure port Bordeau, arrival port New York City, New York, New york, ship name Anglo Mexican, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Contemporary Notables of the name Loyless (post 1700)


  • Tom W. Loyless (1871-1926), American managing owner of the Warm Springs spa resort, former editor of the Augusta Chronicle; Franklin D. Roosevelt helped him improve the spa for victims of polio; inspiration for the film Warm Springs (2005)

The Loyless Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtute et numine
Motto Translation: By virtue and prudence.


Loyless Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJG3-76J : 6 December 2014), Margaret Loyless, 15 Sep 1911; citing departure port St. John's, Newfoundland, arrival port New York, ship name Florizel, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJGL-528 : 6 December 2014), Donald A. Loyless, 23 Oct 1911; citing departure port London, arrival port New York, ship name Minneapolis, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJGL-526 : 6 December 2014), Augustus Loyless, 23 Oct 1911; citing departure port London, arrival port New York, ship name Minneapolis, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJCH-L3X : 6 December 2014), John Loyless, 25 May 1917; citing departure port Bordeau, arrival port New York City, New York, New york, ship name Anglo Mexican, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).


Sign Up