Longthorp History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Longthorp family

The surname Longthorp was first found in Yorkshire in the North Riding at Langstrothdale, a scenic valley in the Yorkshire Dales. Literally the place name means "of the lang strother," in other words, "the long marsh." [1]

Another source claims the name is from the lands of Langthorp(e), also in North Yorkshire which was held Gospatrick, Earl of Northumberland who was recorded in the Domesday Book census of 1086. [2] In this case, the place name meant "outlying farmstead or hamlet of a woman called Langlif," from the Viking personal name + "thorpe." [3] Today, Langthorp is a township, in the parish of Kirkbyon-the-Moor, wapentake of Hallikeld. [4]

Early records of the family are scarce. However, the Register of the University of Oxford records Richard Langstrothyr in 1448 and William Langstrother in 1450. [1]

Early History of the Longthorp family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Longthorp research. Another 46 words (3 lines of text) covering the years 1212, 1448, 1676, 1498, 1530, 1514, 1490 and 1549 are included under the topic Early Longthorp History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Longthorp Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Longthorp have been found, including Langthorpe, Lanthorp, Langthorp, Langthrop, Langthropp, Longthorp, Longthorpe, Longthrup, Longthropp, Langstroth, Langstrath, Langstreeth and many more.

Early Notables of the Longthorp family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Agnes Langstroth (1498-1530) an English woman who allegedly was the illegitimate daughter of Princess Bridget of York. Originally known as Agnes of Eltham, she was an orphan and ward of the Dartford Priory in Dartford, Kent. The Priory was also the home of Princess Bridget of York, younger sister to Elizabeth, queen...
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Longthorp Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Longthorp family

For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Longthorp were among those contributors: the name represented in many forms and recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands..



  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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