Jiggle History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Jiggle is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the baptismal nameJukel or Gikel. The surname Jiggle referred to the son of Jukel which belongs to the category of patronymic surnames.

"The ancient Breton name Judicaël gave birth to the twin-names Juhel and Gicquel, appearing in mediæval English records as Jukel and Gikel." [1]

"The Christian name of Judhael de Totnes is still found as a surname in Devonshire as Jewell, and elsewhere as Jekyll and Joel." [2]

"This surname is derived from the name of an ancestor. 'the son of Jukel' or 'Gikel.' Although the personal name soon died out, the surname formed from it struggled into existence and still lives.' [3]

As a forename, the first occurrence was found in the Chronicles of the Mayors and Sheriffs of London, 1188-1274 where Jukel Alderman was listed as Sheriff of London in 1194. [3]

Early Origins of the Jiggle family

The surname Jiggle was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where the original Latin forms of the name were found in two entries in Cheshire: Judichel uenator and Judicaelis. [4]

A few years later, Gykell, Jukel de Jertheburc was listed in Lincolnshire c.1170 and in 1182; Johannes filius Jokell', Jukell' was entered in the Assize Rolls for 1218; and Jukel Brito was in the Curia Regis Rolls for Norfolk in 1207. [2]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 had two early listings of the family: Johannes Jukel, Buckinghamshire; and Richard Gikell, Lincolnshire. [3]

Dr. Henry Jekyll and his alter ego Mr. Edward Hyde, is the main character of Robert Louis Stevenson's 1886 novella "Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." However, Stevenson makes no mention of why he chose the protagonist's name.

Early History of the Jiggle family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jiggle research. Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1174, 1201, 1273, 1273, 1670, 1570, 1653, 1570, 1663, 1738, 1697, 1717, 1702, 1717, 1738, 1680, 1687, 1646, 1698 and 1646 are included under the topic Early Jiggle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jiggle Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Jiggle include Jeckell, Jeckel, Jekyl, Jekyll, Jeckyll, Jeckyl, Jekylls, Jekel and many more.

Early Notables of the Jiggle family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Thomas Jekyll (1570-1653), English antiquary, born in the parish of St. Helen, Bishopsgate, London, on 12 Jan. 1570, the eldest son of John Stocker Jekyll of Newington, Middlesex, by Mary, daughter and heiress of Nicholas Barnehouse of Wellington, Somerset. "Availing himself of his access to legal records, Jekyll filled above forty volumes with valuable materials for the histories of Essex, Norfolk, and Suffolk (Gough, British Topography, i. 345). A portion of the Jekyll collection was included in the list of manuscripts belonging to John Ouseley, rector of...
Another 92 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jiggle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jiggle family

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants: John Jeckyll, who sailed to New England in 1733; George Jekel to Philadelphia in 1844; Peter Jeckel to America in 1853; Thomas Jaekle to New York in 1861.



  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)


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