Irbye History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Irbye reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Irbye family lived in Lincolnshire, at Irby by the Marsh, or Irby, a township, in the parishes of Thurstaston and Woodchurch, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Wirrall in Cheshire. "The manor was given to the convent of St. Werburgh in 1093, and continued in the possession of that establishment until the Dissolution, when it was granted to the Dean and Chapter of the new diocese of Chester." [1]

Early Origins of the Irbye family

The surname Irbye was first found in Lincolnshire at Irby by the Marsh, a village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district which dates back to c. 1115 when it was listed as Irebi. Irby upon Humber or Irby-on-Humber is a small village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire. This parish dates back further to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was listed as Iribi. [2]

Other locals include: Irby, a village on the Wirral Peninsula; Ireby, a village in Cumbria; and Ireby, a small hamlet and civil parish bordering on Lancashire and North Yorkshire. The place name is believed to literally mean "farmstead or village of the Irishmen," having derived from the Old Scandinavian name "Irar" + "by." [3]

The first record of the family was found in Lincolnshire where Hugh, Ailsi de Yrebi was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1193 and later in the Pipe Rolls for Cumbria (Cumberland) in 1195. William de Irby was found in Yorkshire in 1280 and later, Richard Yrby was in Gloucestershire in 1341. [4]

Edward Irby, (1676-1718) was Member of Parliament for Boston, and was created a Baronet, of Whaplode and Boston in the County of Lincoln, in the Baronetage of England on 13 April 1704. This peerage was elevated to Baron Boston, of Boston in the County of Lincoln in 1761 and continues today.

Early History of the Irbye family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Irbye research. Another 151 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1068, 1114, 1547, 1625, 1589, 1622, 1577, 1610, 1605, 1681, 1676, 1718, 1702, 1707, 1707 and 1708 are included under the topic Early Irbye History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Irbye Spelling Variations

Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Irbye family name include Irby, Irbey, Irbie, Irbye and others.

Early Notables of the Irbye family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Anthony Irby (1547-1625), English Master of Chancery, Recorder and Member of Parliament for Boston between 1589 and 1622; Sir Anthony Irby (1577-1610), English Member of Parliament...
Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Irbye Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Irbye migration to the United States +

To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Irbye family to immigrate North America:

Irbye Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Walter Irbye, who arrived in Virginia in 1652 [5]


The Irbye Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Honor fidelitatis praemium
Motto Translation: Honor, the reward of fidelity.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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