Hicking History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Hicking comes from when the family resided in Hickling, a parish in the county of Norfolk.

Early Origins of the Hicking family

The surname Hicking was first found in Norfolk at Hickling, a village and a civil parish that dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was listed as Hikelinga. [1] The place name literally meant "settlement of a family or followers of man called Hicel," from the Old English personal name + "-ingas". [2] "A priory of Black canons, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, St. Augustine, and All Saints, was founded in the year 1185, by Theobald de Valentia or Valoins." [3] Another Hickling is found in Nottinghamshire. This village near Melton Mowbray is on the southernmost border of Nottinghamshire. In this case, the place name was first listed as Hikelinge c. 1000 and later listed as Hechelinge in the Domesday Book. [2] St. Luke's church "is a handsome ancient structure, with a lofty tower: the lid of a stone coffin, curiously inscribed with Runic characters, has been discovered in the chancel." [3]

Early History of the Hicking family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hicking research. Another 101 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1163 and 1327 are included under the topic Early Hicking History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hicking Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Hicking include Hickling, Hicklin, Hicking and others.

Early Notables of the Hicking family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Hicking Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Hicking migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Hicking Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mary A. Hicking, aged 28, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Cartvale" in 1874


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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