Haughtant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Haughtant is one of the thousands of new names that the Norman Conquest brought to England in 1066. The Haughtant family lived in Haughton, Cheshire. The name of this place derives from the Old English word halh, which means nook or recess, and tun, which means village or settlement. [1]

Early Origins of the Haughtant family

The surname Haughtant was first found in Cheshire at Haughton (or Haughton Moss), a village and civil parish. This village is by far the largest of the listings of the place name in England. Looking back further, there are at least three listings of the place name Haughton in the Domesday Book in its earliest forms: Hoctum in Nottinghamshire; Haustone in Shropshire; and Halstone or Haltone in Staffordshire. [2]

Today Haughton Castle is a privately owned country mansion near the village of Humshaugh, Northumberland and dates back to the 13th century when it was a tower house. It was enlarged and fortified in the 14th century. By the 16th century, the castle had fallen into ruin, but by the early 19th century the ruins were converted into the mansion it is today. Houghton Hall is a country house in Norfolk, England built for British Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole.

Another early branch of the family was found at Hooton, again in Cheshire. "This place, in the Domesday Book, is included in the possessions of Richard de Vernon, the Norman Baron of Shipbrook, under whom it was held by a family named Hotone, which became extinct in the male line in the reign of Richard I. It then passed by marriage to Randle Walensis or Welshman, after which alliance, his family occasionally assumed the name of Hotone." [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed John de Haleghton, Yorkshire; and Alexander de Houhton, Cambridgeshire. [4]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls included: Matilda de Halghton, huswyf, webster, 1370; and Willelmus de Halghton, 1379. [4]

The Assize Rolls of Staffordshire included: Robert de Haleghton in 1242. [5]

Adam de Houghton or Houtone (d. 1389), was Bishop of St. David's and Chancellor of England, "born at Caerforiog in the parish of Whitchurch, near St. David's, but his name clearly shows that his family was of English or Norman origin. Foss's conjecture that he was a son of John de Houghton, Baron of the Exchequer in 1347, seems untenable. Adam de Houghton was educated at Oxford, where he took the degree of doctor of laws. " [6]

Early History of the Haughtant family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haughtant research. Another 206 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1114, 1130, 1621, 1647, 1642, 1663, 1488, 1535, 1488, 1548, 1624, 1548, 1605, 1604, 1597, 1705, 1691, 1720 and 1720 are included under the topic Early Haughtant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Haughtant Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Haughtant are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Haughtant include Haughton, Houghton, Hoctor, Hector and others.

Early Notables of the Haughtant family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Houghton (1488?-1535), English prior of the London Charterhouse, born in Essex of honourable parents in or about 1488, studied at Cambridge, and took the degrees of B.A. and LL.B. "His parents then wished him to marry, but as he had resolved to embrace the ecclesiastical life, he left them and dwelt in concealment with a devout priest until he could himself take holy orders. " [6] Sir Robert Houghton (1548-1624), was an English judge, son of John Houghton of Gunthorpe, Norfolk and was born at Gunthorpe on 3...
Another 95 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haughtant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Haughtant family to Ireland

Some of the Haughtant family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 105 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Haughtant family

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Haughtant, or a variant listed above: Gerard Haughton settled in Barbados in 1639; Thomas Haughton settled in Virginia in 1635; as well as Robert Haughton in the same year.



The Haughtant Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Malgre le tort
Motto Translation: Despite the wrong.


  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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