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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017

Origins Available: English, Irish


Haught is a name that came to England in the 11th century wave of migration that was set off by the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Haught family lived in Haughton, Cheshire. The name of this place derives from the Old English word halh, which means nook or recess, and tun, which means village or settlement. There are numerous places son named in England and an individual case of the name may derive from any of those locations.

Haught Early Origins



The surname Haught was first found in Cheshire at Haughton (or Haughton Moss), a village and civil parish. This village is by far the largest of the listings of the place name in England. Looking back further, there are at least three listings of the place name Haughton in the Domesday Book in its earliest forms: Hoctum in Nottinghamshire; Haustone in Shropshire; and Halstone or Haltone in Staffordshire. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
Today Haughton Castle is a privately owned country mansion near the village of Humshaugh, Northumberland and dates back to the 13th century when it was a tower house. It was enlarged and fortified in the 14th century. By the 16th century, the castle had fallen into ruin but by the early 19th century the ruins were converted into the mansion it is today. Houghton Hall is a country house in Norfolk, England built for British Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole. Another early branch of the family was found at Hooton, again in Cheshire. "This place, in the Domesday Book, is included in the possessions of Richard de Vernon, the Norman Baron of Shipbrook, under whom it was held by a family named Hotone, which became extinct in the male line in the reign of Richard I. It then passed by marriage to Randle Walensis or Welshman, after which alliance, his family occasionally assumed the name of Hotone." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Haught Spelling Variations


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Haught Spelling Variations



The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Haught has been recorded under many different variations, including Haughton, Houghton, Hoctor, Hector and others.

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Haught Early History


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Haught Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haught research. Another 343 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1114, 1130, 1605, 1691, 1720 and 1720 are included under the topic Early Haught History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Haught Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Haught Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haught Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Haught In Ireland


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Haught In Ireland



Some of the Haught family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 199 words (14 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Haughts were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America:

Haught Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Harry Haught, originally from Bootle, arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Baltic" from Liverpool, England [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Z-5ML : 6 December 2014), Harry Haught, 29 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port N.Y., ship name Baltic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Albert H. Haught, aged 33, destined for Indianapolis, Ind., arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Espagne" from Bordeaux, France [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6Q4-V66 : 6 December 2014), Albert H. Haught, 01 Jan 1919; citing departure port Bordeaux, arrival port New York, ship name Espagne, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Cecilia P. Haught, aged 20, destined for Washington, D. C., U. S. A., arrived in New York in 1922 aboard the ship "Cantigney" from Antwerp, Belgium [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNLZ-YM2 : 6 December 2014), Cecilia P. Haught, 30 Jun 1922; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Cantigney, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Estella C. Haught, destined for Washington, D. C., U. S. A., arrived in New York in 1922 aboard the ship "Cantigney" from Antwerp, Belgium [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNLZ-YML : 6 December 2014), Estella C. Haught, 30 Jun 1922; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Cantigney, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

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Contemporary Notables of the name Haught (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Haught (post 1700)



  • John F. Haught, American Roman Catholic theologian
  • Gary Allen Haught (b. 1970), American former Major League Baseball pitcher for the Oakland Athletics in the 1997 season
  • James F. Haught (b. 1924), American Democrat politician, Member of West Virginia State House of Delegates from Wood County, 1959-60 [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 5) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Eldon J. Haught, American Democrat politician, Chair of Ritchie County Democratic Party, 1969-70, 1983; Candidate for West Virginia State House of Delegates 7th District, 1976 [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 5) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Dale A. Haught, American Democrat politician, Candidate for Michigan State Senate 19th District, 1970 [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 5) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Malgre le tort
Motto Translation: Despite the wrong.


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Haught Family Crest Products


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Haught Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J64Z-5ML : 6 December 2014), Harry Haught, 29 Sep 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port N.Y., ship name Baltic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6Q4-V66 : 6 December 2014), Albert H. Haught, 01 Jan 1919; citing departure port Bordeaux, arrival port New York, ship name Espagne, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNLZ-YM2 : 6 December 2014), Cecilia P. Haught, 30 Jun 1922; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Cantigney, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNLZ-YML : 6 December 2014), Estella C. Haught, 30 Jun 1922; citing departure port Antwerp, arrival port New York, ship name Cantigney, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  7. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 5) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

Other References

  1. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  2. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  3. Sanders, Joanne McRee Edition. English Settlers in Barbados 1637-1800. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  5. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  6. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
  7. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  8. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  9. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  10. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  11. ...

The Haught Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Haught Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 31 October 2017 at 13:03.

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