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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Origins Available: English, German


The name Harms thought to be of Norman heritage. It is a name for a person who was a good friend or beloved one. The name was originally derived from the Old French given name or nickname Amis or Ami, which means friend.

Harms Early Origins



The surname Harms was first found in the county of Northumberland, where they were granted lands by King William after the Norman Conquest in 1066. They originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy.

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Harms Spelling Variations


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Harms Spelling Variations



Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Ames, Amess, Amies, Amis, Amiss, Amos, Hames, Haymes, Eames, Emmes and many more.

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Harms Early History


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Harms Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Harms research. Another 355 words (25 lines of text) covering the years 1889, 1640, 1692, 1721, 1576, 1633, 1619, 1695, 1689, 1759, 1641, 1721 and 1692 are included under the topic Early Harms History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Harms Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Harms Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Ames (Latin: Guilielmus Amesius) (1576-1633), an English Protestant divine, philosopher, and controversialist; Henry Metcalfe Ames, of Lynden, Northumberland; Joseph Ames (1619-1695), an English naval commander from Norfolk who commanded several ships of war, and made repeated voyages to...

Another 46 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Harms Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Harms or a variant listed above were:

Harms Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Wilhelm Harms, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1802
  • Arnd Harms, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1808
  • Carsten Harms, who arrived in North America in 1832-1849
  • Cath Harms, who landed in North America in 1832-1849
  • Cord Harms, who arrived in North America in 1832-1849
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Harms Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Hendrick Harms, who landed in Alabama in 1917

Harms Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Gehrhard Harms, who arrived in Manitoba in 1874
  • Johan Harms, who landed in Manitoba in 1874
  • Peter Harms, who arrived in Manitoba in 1874
  • Wittwi Harms, who landed in Manitoba in 1875
  • Johan Harms, who arrived in Manitoba in 1876
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Harms Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Nicholas Harms, aged 26, a farm labourer, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Edinburgh" in 1873
  • Catherine Harms, aged 28, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Edinburgh" in 1873
  • Henry Harms, aged 8 months, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duke of Edinburgh" in 1873

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Contemporary Notables of the name Harms (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Harms (post 1700)



  • Oliver Raymond Harms (1901-1980), American President of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod from 1962 to 1969
  • Joni Harms (b. 1959), American country music singer-songwriter
  • Jesse Harms (b. 1953), American session keyboard player and songwriter
  • Alexander T. Harms (1855-1901), American businessman who co-founded Thomas B. Harms Music Publishing Company, brother of Thomas B. Harms
  • Thomas B. Harms (1860-1906), American businessman who co-founded Thomas B. Harms Music Publishing Company, a popular music publishing company in 1881
  • John N. Harms (b. 1940), American politician, Member of the Nebraska Legislature (2007-2015)
  • Samuel D. Harms, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 2008
  • Fred H. Harms, American politician, Delegate to Iowa convention to ratify 21st amendment from Fayette County, 1933
  • Edward Clair Harms Jr. (1924-2005), American politician, Mayor of Springfield, Oregon, 1952-60
  • Ron Harms (b. 1936), former American football coach
  • ... (Another 14 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Suggested Readings for the name Harms


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Suggested Readings for the name Harms



  • Biographical Notes and Genealogy of Descendants in Netherlands and America of Gert Harms an Grietje Raak Family Staphorst, Netherland: Early 1700-early 1900 by Margaret Raak Vanderploeg.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fama candida rosa dulcior
Motto Translation: Fame is sweeter than the white rose.


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Harms Family Crest Products


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Harms Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
    2. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    3. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
    4. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
    5. Dunkling, Leslie. Dictionary of Surnames. Toronto: Collins, 1998. Print. (ISBN 0004720598).
    6. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
    7. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
    8. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
    9. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
    10. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
    11. ...

    The Harms Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Harms Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 16 June 2016 at 11:47.

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