Grimmond History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The rugged western mountains of Scotland's coastline and the Hebrides islands were home to the ancestors of the Grimmond family. Grimmond was originally a name for a person noted as a guardian. The name, which is Mac Cruimein in Gaelic, is derived from the Old Norse Hromund, which means famed protector. "The late Dr. Alexander Carmichael, who gives the Gaelic form of the name as Maccriomthain, says that a woman of the name in St. Kilda recited some of the island songs to him. " [1]

Interestingly, Crimond is a parish, in the district of Deer, county of Aberdeen. "This place once contained a castle belonging to the celebrated Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, which stood on a small hill called Castlehill, and was suffered to fall into ruins after his fatal defeat at the battle of Inverury by Robert Bruce. " [2]

Early Origins of the Grimmond family

The surname Grimmond was first found in on the Isle of Skye, where they were hereditary Pipers to the MacLeods of Dunvegan and founded the famous College of Piping, the most celebrated of its kind in the world.

"A family of the name were hereditary pipers to Macleod of Macleod, the last of whom, Lieut. MacCrimmon, had a farm in Glenelg in the first quarter of the nineteenth century. The name is found on one of the rune-inscribed crosses at Kirk Michael, Isle of Man, as Rumun. " [1]

Interestingly, Crimond is a parish, in the district of Deer, county of Aberdeen. "This place once contained a castle belonging to the celebrated Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, which stood on a small hill called Castlehill, and was suffered to fall into ruins after his fatal defeat at the battle of Inverury by Robert Bruce. " [2]

Important Dates for the Grimmond family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Grimmond research. Another 97 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 153 and 1533 are included under the topic Early Grimmond History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Grimmond Spelling Variations

Spelling variations are a very common occurrence in records of early Scottish names. They result from the repeated and inaccurate translations that many names went through in the course of various English occupations of Scotland. Grimmond has been spelled MacCrimmon, MacRimmon, MacCrummen, MacCrummin, Crimmon, Crimmons, Crimmin and many more.

Early Notables of the Grimmond family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Grimmond Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Grimmond migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Grimmond Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • George Grimmond, aged 38, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "William Stevenson" [3]
  • Mary Grimmond, aged 14, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "William Stevenson" [3]

Grimmond migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Grimmond Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Robert Grimmond, British labourer travelling from London aboard the ship "Maori" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 16th April 1857 [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Grimmond (post 1700)

  • Robert Grimmond, British founder of Offshore Marine Management in 2003
  • Joseph Grimmond (1843-1924), New Zealand politician, Member of Parliament for Hokitika (1887–1890)
  • Dick Grimmond (b. 1938), Australian rules footballer who played from 1959 to 1964

Citations

  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ South Australian Register Friday 2nd February 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) William Stevenson 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/williamstevenson1855.shtml
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
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