Freeack History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Freeack family

The surname Freeack was first found in Norfolk where Richard de la Fryth was recorded in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 in Norfolk. [1] Another source lists John atte Frithe in Norfolk but no date is given. [2]

Later, the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Thomas atte Fryth. [1]

"Robert Firth was the name of two mayors of Doncaster [Yorkshire] in the reigns of Henry VII. and Henry VIII., and the name is still in the town." [3]

Further to the north in Scotland where most people claim descent, "there is a place named Firth near Lilliesleaf, Roxburghshire." [4] The name of this town in turn comes from the ancient word "firth" meaning "bay."

Early History of the Freeack family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Freeack research. Another 169 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1379, 1522, 1565, 1606, 1630 and 1630 are included under the topic Early Freeack History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Freeack Spelling Variations

Although the name, Freeack, appeared in many references, from time to time, the surname was shown with the spellings Firth, Fyrth, Firthe, Firths and others.

Early Notables of the Freeack family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Freeack Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Freeack family

Gradually becoming disenchanted with life in Ireland many of these uprooted families sailed aboard the armada of sailing ships known as the "White Sails" which plied the stormy Atlantic. These overcrowded ships often arrived with only 60 to 70% of their original passenger list, many dying of cholera, typhoid, dysentery or small pox. In North America, some of the first immigrants who could be considered kinsmen of the Freeack family name Freeack, or who bore a variation of the surname were Isaac Firth who landed in America in 1698; Elizabeth Firth settled in Maryland in 1722; George Firth settled in Nova Scotia in 1774; Albert, B.G. Barker, Charles, Daniel, Greenwood, Henry, James, John, Joseph, Richard, Samuel, Thomas and William Firth, all settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between 1805 and 1874. In Newfoundland, Gideon Firth settled in Harbour Grace in 1771.



The Freeack Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Deus incrementum dedit
Motto Translation: God has given increase.


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Rye, Walter, A History of Norfolk. London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1885. Print
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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