Fleyar History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Fleyar family

The surname Fleyar was first found in Devon where they held a family seat "at Floyer-Hayes, in the parish of St. Thomas in that county, soon after the Norman Conquest." [1] The estate remained in the family until the latter part of the 17th century.

"Burke says, that the pedigree of the Floyers of co. Dorset is 'authentically deduced from Floierus, who settled soon after the Norman Conquest on the lands beyond the river Exe, co. Devon, whence the name of Floiers-Landa and Floiers-Hayes.' " [2]

Early History of the Fleyar family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fleyar research. Another 201 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1080, 1091, 1399, 1567, 1685, 1701, 1815, 1455, 1487, 1649, 1734, 1664, 1668, 1671, 1674, 1680, 1686 and 1686 are included under the topic Early Fleyar History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fleyar Spelling Variations

The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Fleyar has been spelled many different ways, including Floyer, Floyar, Fleyer, Fleyar, Floier, Flyer and many more.

Early Notables of the Fleyar family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Sir John Floyer (1649-1734), English physician and writer of Hints Hall, Staffordshire, a since demolished country house. He was the son of Richard Floyer of Hintes, Staffordshire. "He entered as commoner of Queen's College, Oxford, at the beginning of 1664, being then fifteen years of age. He was B.A. 16 April 1668, M.A. 1671, B.M. 27 June 1674, B.M...
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fleyar Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Fleyar family

Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Fleyars to arrive in North America: J. Flayer, aged 42, who arrived in America in 1924.



The Fleyar Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Floret virtus vulnerata
Motto Translation: Wounded virtue flourishes.


  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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