Durbridge History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Durbridge family

The surname Durbridge was first found in Pembroke where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence of English history diminished after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed. But Saxon surnames survived and the family name was first referenced in the 13th century when they held estates in that county.

Early History of the Durbridge family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Durbridge research. Another 132 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1081, 1139, 1532, 1455 and 1487 are included under the topic Early Durbridge History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Durbridge Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Dunbridge, Durbridge, Dunbrigg, Dunbrig, Durbrigg and others.

Early Notables of the Durbridge family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Durbridge Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Durbridge migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Durbridge Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Rebecca Durbridge, (b. 1821), aged 20, English house servant who was convicted in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England for 14 years for robbery, transported aboard the "Emma Eugenia" on 16th November 1841, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [1]
  • Elizabeth Durbridge, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Ramillies" in 1849 [2]
  • Reuben Durbridge, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Ramillies" in 1849 [2]
  • Simeon Durbridge, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Ramillies" in 1849 [2]
  • Richard Shaw Durbridge, aged 31, a gardener, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Admiral Boxer"

New Zealand Durbridge migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Durbridge Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Charles Durbridge, British settler arriving as the 1st detachment of Royal New Zealand Fencible Corps travelling from Tilbury, Essex aboard the ship "Ramillies" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 6th August 1847 [3]

Contemporary Notables of the name Durbridge (post 1700) +

  • Francis Henry Durbridge (1912-1998), English playwright and author
  • Don Durbridge (1939-2012), British radio presenter at BFBS and on BBC Radio 2
  • Luke Durbridge (b. 1991), Australian two-time gold and silver medalist road and track cyclist


  1. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 30th March 2022). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/emma-eugenia
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) RAMILIES 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Ramillies.htm
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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