Cutrer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Cutrer family

The surname Cutrer was first found in Limousin, where the family first originated as one of the distinguished families of the region. In Limousin, members of the family intermarried with other important families of the day, such as the Renon family. Many members of this family were well known for their contributions to the culture and politics of their respective communities.

Guillaume Couture, born in 1617, son of Guillaume and Madeleine (née Malet), travelled from Rouen, France to Canada in 1640. After his arrival he worked as a land clearer and as an interpreter for the Jesuit Fathers in Quebec. He married Anne Aymart, born in 1629, on 16th November 1649. They settled together in Quebec until Anne's death on 18th June 1700, and Guillaume's death in 1702. [1]

Early History of the Cutrer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cutrer research. More information is included under the topic Early Cutrer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cutrer Spelling Variations

Changes of spelling have occurred in most surnames. The earliest explanation is that during the early development of the French language, names were not yet fixed in spelling. Usually a person gave his version of his name, phonetically, to a scribe, a priest, or a recorder. This depended on accent, and local accents frequently changed the spelling of a name. Some variables were adopted by different branches of the family name. Hence, there are some spelling variations of the name Cutrer, including Couture, Cousture, Coudure, Couturas, Couturat, Coutureau, Couturaud, Couturot, Couturier, Couturié, Couturière, Lecouturier, Lecouturié, Coudurier, Coudurié, Coudurière, Lecoudurier, Lecoudurié, Cousturier, Cousturié, Cousturière, Lecousturier, Lecousturié and many more.

Early Notables of the Cutrer family (pre 1700)

Another 44 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cutrer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Cutrer migration to the United States +

Approximately 110 years after the first landings by Cartier, there were only about 300 people in Quebec. France gave land incentives for 2,000 migrants during the next decade. Early marriage was desperately encouraged amongst the immigrants. The fur trade attracted migrants, both noble and commoner. 15,000 explorers left Montreal in the late 17th and 18th centuries. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. Migration to New France (Quebec) continued from France until it fell in 1759. In the year 1675 the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported to Louisiana. The French founded Lower Canada, thus becoming one of the two great founding nations of Canada. The distinguished family name Cutrer has made significant contributions to the culture, arts, sciences and religion of France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Cutrer were

Cutrer Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • John Cutrer, aged 20, who immigrated to the United States, in 1914
  • Robert Cutrer, aged 21, who landed in America, in 1919

Contemporary Notables of the name Cutrer (post 1700) +

  • Lewis Wesley Cutrer (1904-1981), American politician, Mayor of Houston, Texas from 1957 to 1963, eponym of the Lewis W. Cutrer Terminal in the George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Houston, Texas
  • T. Tommy Cutrer, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1980 [2]
  • R. W. Cutrer, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1936 [2]
  • Lewis Wesley Cutrer (1904-1981), American politician, Mayor of Houston, Texas, 1958-63; Defeated, 1963 [2]
  • Jesse H. Cutrer Jr., American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1952 [2]


  1. ^ Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 23) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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