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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The chronicles of the Cult family reach back into Scottish history to an ancient tribe known as the Picts. The ancestors of the Cult family lived in the barony of Colt or Cult in Perthshire.

Cult Early Origins



The surname Cult was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

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Cult Spelling Variations


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Cult Spelling Variations



When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became standardized. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they were written. Cult has been written Coult, Colt, Cult, Culte, Colte, Coulte and others.

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Cult Early History


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Cult Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cult research. Another 257 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1440 and 1835 are included under the topic Early Cult History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Cult Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Cult Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 23 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cult Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



The crossing to North America did not seem so great in comparison with the hardships many Scots endured at home. It was long, expensive, and cramped, but also rewarding. North America offered land and the chance for settlers to prove themselves in a new place. And many did prove themselves as they fought to forge a new nation in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of those Scots can now experience much of their once-lost heritage through the Clan societies and highland games that have sprung up across North America in the last century. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important, early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Cult: George Colt who settled in Virginia in 1654; John Colt settled in Massachusetts in 1633; Richard Colt settled in Virginia in 1656; John Godfrey Colte arrived in Philadelphia in 1753.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Transfigam
Motto Translation: I will transfix.


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Cult Family Crest Products


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Cult Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
    2. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    3. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Socts Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Modern Application of the Art of Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    4. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
    5. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
    6. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    7. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    8. Fulton, Alexander. Scotland and Her Tartans: The Romantic Heritage of the Scottish Clans and Families. Godalming: Bramley, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-86283-880-0).
    9. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
    10. Skene, William Forbes Edition. Chronicles of the Picts, Chronicles of the Scots and Other Early Memorials of Scottish History. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1867. Print.
    11. ...

    The Cult Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Cult Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 24 February 2016 at 14:35.

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