Cragie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Cragie family

The surname Cragie was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire.

Criagie is a village, in the parish of Dalmeny, county of Linlithgow. "It is in the eastern part of the parish, and in its vicinity is Craigie Hall, formerly the residence and estate of the Craigies, an ancient and considerable family. One of them was a witness to the original charter granted to the first laird of Dundas in the year 1120." [1]

The Barony of Craigie is a Scottish feudal Crown barony near Dundee and there are two other locals named Craigie: a hamlet in the parish of Caputh; and a village, in the East parish of the city and county of Perth. The latter is home "of the old castle of Craigie" [1]

Early History of the Cragie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cragie research. Another 228 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1317, 1367, 1429, 1430, 1387, 1640, 1400, 1427, 1688, 1760, 1742, 1747, 1754 and 1760 are included under the topic Early Cragie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cragie Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that rules have developed and the process of spelling according to sound has been abandoned. Scottish names from before that time tend to appear under many different spelling variations. Cragie has been spelled Craigie, Craiggie, Craggy, Cragye, Criggie, Cragyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Cragie family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family at this time was Sir William Craigie compiler of the Oxford Dictionary, a man of many words; and Robert Craigie (1688-1760), Scottish Member of Parliament for Tain Burghs (1742 to 1747), Lord President...
Another 37 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cragie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Cragie migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Cragie Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • James Cragie, aged 20, a shoemaker, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874


The Cragie Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Honeste vivo
Motto Translation: I live honestly.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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