Craddox History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

The origins of the ancient name Craddox belong to that rich Celtic tradition that comes from Wales. This surname was derived from the Welsh personal name Caradoc, meaning "amiable." Other forms of this ancient forename are Caradawc, Cradawc, and Caradog. This name was made famous by the ancient Welsh military leader Caratacos, whose name was Latinized as Caratacus. He was celebrated for his opposition to the Roman occupation of Britain, and was taken to Rome as a prisoner circa 51 AD.

Early Origins of the Craddox family

The surname Craddox was first found in Glamorganshire (Welsh: Sir Forgannwg), a region of South Wales, anciently part of the Welsh kingdom of Glywysing. However, some of the family were found in Whaston (Washton) in the North Riding of Yorkshire in early times. "It comprises about 1200 acres, partly the property of the Craddock family." [1]

Over in Monmouthshire, the parish of Portskuett held an early entry for the family. "The name, originally Porthis-Coed, signifies 'the port below the wood;' and, according to tradition, here was the port or landing-place for Venta Siluram, now Caerwent. A magnificent palace was built at this spot by Harold, son of Earl Godwin, who entertained Edward the Confessor within its walls; but shortly afterwards, Caradoc ab Grufydd, a Welsh chieftain, having a pique against Harold, razed the palace, and carried away the materials." [1]

Carodag (d. 1035), was a South Welsh prince, a son of Rhydderch, who had seized the government of Deheubarth, and died in 1031 at the hands of Irish pirates. [2]

Caradog ap Gruffydd (died 1081) was a Prince of Gwent in south-east Wales, grandson of Rhydderch ab Iestyn (died 1033), king of Gwent and Morgannwg. Caradog ap Gruffydd was killed at the Battle of Mynydd Carn.

Caradog of Llancarvan (d. 1147?), was a Welsh ecclesiastic and chronicler, was, as his name indicates, probably either born at or a monk of the famous abbey of Llancarvan in the vale of Glamorgan. [2]

Important Dates for the Craddox family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Craddox research. Another 178 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1603, 1604, 1619, 1836, 1512, 1516, 1606, 1659, 1638, 1636, 1621, 1615, 1641, 1628, 1629, 1660, 1716 and 1797 are included under the topic Early Craddox History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Craddox Spelling Variations

There are relatively few surnames native to Wales, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. Early variations of Welsh surnames can be explained by the fact that very few people in the early Middle Ages were literate. Priests and the few other literate people were responsible for recording names in official documents. And because most people could not specific how to properly record their names it was up to the individual recorder of that time to determine how a spoken name should be recorded. Variations due to the imprecise or improper recording of a name continued later in history when names originally composed in the Brythonic Celtic, language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, were transliterated into English. Welsh names that were documented in English often changed dramatically since the native language of Wales, which was highly inflected, did not copy well. Occasionally, however, spelling variations were carried out according to an individual's specific design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations could be indicated by minor variations. The spelling variations of the name Craddox have included Craddock, Caradoc, Cradoc, Craddoch, Cradoch, Cradock, Caradoch, Carradock, Carradoch, Caradock and many more.

Early Notables of the Craddox family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was William Cradock, Archdeacon of Lewes from 1512 to 1516; Walter Cradock or Craddock or Cradoc (c.1606-1659), a Welsh Anglican clergyman, became a traveling evangelical preacher, founder of the first Independent church in Wales (1638); Matthew Cradock (died 1636), an English wool...
Another 51 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Craddox Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Craddox family to Ireland

Some of the Craddox family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 71 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Craddox family

North America in the 1800s and 1900s saw the arrival of many Welsh people hoping to share in the wealth of land, work, and freedom that they felt North America held. Those who made the journey often attained those expectations, but only through an enormous amount of hard work, perseverance, and often a bout of good luck. These immigrants helped contribute to the growth of industry, commerce, and culture of both Canada and the United States. Discovered in the immigration and passenger lists were a number of people bearing the name Craddox: Matthew Craddock who became the Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1650; and the Rev. Thomas Craddock settled in Maryland from Bedfordshire, England in the year 1744..

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Citations

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
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