Crackind History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

Early Origins of the Crackind family

The surname Crackind was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire.

Criagie is a village, in the parish of Dalmeny, county of Linlithgow. "It is in the eastern part of the parish, and in its vicinity is Craigie Hall, formerly the residence and estate of the Craigies, an ancient and considerable family. One of them was a witness to the original charter granted to the first laird of Dundas in the year 1120." [1]

The Barony of Craigie is a Scottish feudal Crown barony near Dundee and there are two other locals named Craigie: a hamlet in the parish of Caputh; and a village, in the East parish of the city and county of Perth. The latter is home "of the old castle of Craigie" [1]

Important Dates for the Crackind family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Crackind research. Another 228 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1317, 1367, 1429, 1430, 1387, 1640, 1400, 1427, 1688, 1760, 1742, 1747 and 1754 are included under the topic Early Crackind History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Crackind Spelling Variations

Spelling and translation were hardly exact sciences in Medieval Scotland. Sound, rather than any set of rules, was the basis for spellings, so one name was often spelled different ways even within a single document. Spelling variations are thus an extremely common occurrence in Medieval Scottish names. Crackind has been spelled Craigie, Craiggie, Craggy, Cragye, Criggie, Cragyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Crackind family (pre 1700)

Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Crackind Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Crackind family

Such hard times forced many to leave their homeland in search of opportunity across the Atlantic. Many of these families settled along the east coast of North America in communities that would become the backbones of the young nations of the United States and Canada. The ancestors of many of these families have rediscovered their roots in the 20th century through the establishment of Clan societies and other patriotic Scottish organizations. Among them: James Craigie who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1729; Margaret Craigie settled in Savannah Georgia in 1774.

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Citations

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
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