Chant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Chant family

The surname Chant was first found in Dauphine.

Early History of the Chant family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Chant research. Another 43 words (3 lines of text) covering the years 1697, 1848, 1885, and 1897 are included under the topic Early Chant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Chant Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Chant, Chanteau, Chantel, Chantelot, Chantelat, Chantelou and many more.

Early Notables of the Chant family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family at this time was Augustin-Francis de Chanteau, who was born in Metz in 1848. He came from a family of the region of Alsace of which one of the members had built the fortifications of Strasbourg and furnished the Councillors for the Chamber of counts at Dôle. He obtained his law licence in Paris and his diploma of archaeologist/paleologist. Nominated as archivist for the department at Vosges, he quit after a short time...
Another 76 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Chant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Chant migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Chant Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Andrew Chant, who arrived in Virginia in 1628 [1]

Canada Chant migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Chant Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Mark Chant, (b. 1836), aged 19, English labourer, from West Chinnock, Somerset, England, UK departing from Falmouth destined for Quebec, Canada aboard the ship "Barque John" on 3rd May 1855 which sank after striking the reef, he survived the sinking [2]

Australia Chant migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Chant Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Samuel Chant, Jr., English convict who was convicted in Dorset, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Dromedary" on 11th September 1819, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [3]
  • Jabez Chant, aged 26, a farm servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "China" [4]
  • Henry Chant, aged 28, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "William Prowse" [5]

New Zealand Chant migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Chant Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Chant, aged 25, a labourer, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842
  • Eliza Chant, aged 21, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842
  • Ellen Chant, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842

Contemporary Notables of the name Chant (post 1700) +

  • James R. Chant, American Democratic Party politician, Candidate for New York State Assembly from Fulton and Hamilton counties, 1920 [6]
  • George Chant, American politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 11th District, 1924 [6]
  • F. Raymond Chant, American Democratic Party politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1932 [6]
  • Donald Chant, Canadian Chairman of Ontario Waste Management Corporation (1980-) and lives in Toronto

Senghenydd colliery
  • Mr. George Chant (b. 1879), Welsh coal miner from Senghenydd, Caerphilly, Wales who was working at the Senghenydd colliery when there was an explosion on the 14th October 1913; he died


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/wreck_of_emigrant_ship_john_1855.pdf
  3. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 16th July 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/dromedary
  4. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) CHINA 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/china1852.shtml
  5. ^ South Australian Register Monday 21st August 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) William Prowse 1856. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/williamprowse1854.shtml
  6. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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