Chamberlan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Chamberlan family was an integral part of the history ancient France since it was derived from the northern, coastal region of Normandy. Chamberlan was a name given to a person who worked as a chamberlain. A chamberlain was one who was in charge of the private chambers of a noble, and later was a high ranking title having derived from the Anglo Norman French word, "chamberlan."

Early Origins of the Chamberlan family

The surname Chamberlan was first found in Normandy (French: Normandie), the former Duchy of Normandy, where this distinguished family held a family seat.

"John, Count de Tankerville, of Tankerville Castle, in Normandy, took part in the expedition against England, but returned after the battle of Hastings to his hereditary estates, leaving a son in the conquered country, who became chamberlain to Henry I., and whose son, Richard, assumed the surname of Chamberlain from his office." [1]

Early History of the Chamberlan family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Chamberlan research. Another 72 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1616, 1703, 1666 and 1723 are included under the topic Early Chamberlan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Chamberlan Spelling Variations

The many different spellings of French surnames can be partially explained by the use of local dialects and by the influence of other languages during the early development of the French language. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Chamberlan is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Chamberland, Chambellain, Chamberlan, Chamberlain, Chambellan, Chambellayn, Chambelain, Chamberlayne, Chamberlaine, Chamberllayne, Chamberlayn, Chamberleine, Chamberlane, Chambelan, Chambelane, Chambelaine and many more.

Early Notables of the Chamberlan family (pre 1700)

Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Chamberlan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Canada Chamberlan migration to Canada +

In the 1700s, land incentives were finally given out by France to 2,000 migrants. Early marriage was encouraged in New France, and youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted migrants, both noble and commoner from France. 15,000 explorers left Montreal in the late 17th and 18th centuries, leaving French names scattered across the continent. The search for the Northwest passage continued. Migration from France to New France or Quebec, as it was now more popularly called, continued until 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, Acadia were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name Chamberlan were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Chamberlan were

Chamberlan Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Simon Chamberlan, son of Simon and Marie, who married Élisabeth Rondeau, daughter of Pierre and Catherine, in Sainte-Famille, Quebec on 28th April 1692 [2]
  • Gabriel Chamberlan, son of Simon and Marie, who married Catherine Alaire, daughter of Charles and Catherine, in Saint-François-de-l'Île-d'Orléans, Quebec on 3rd November 1694 [2]
  • Ignace Chamberlan, son of Simon and Marie, who married Madeleine Rondeau, daughter of Pierre and Catherine, in Saint-Jean-de-l'Île-d'Orléans, Quebec on 2nd March 1699 [2]
Chamberlan Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Gabriel Chamberlan, son of Gabriel and Catherine, who married Élisabeth Desmouliers, daughter of Jacques and Élisabeth, in Islet, Quebec on 29th October 1726 [2]
  • Pierre Chamberlan, son of Ignace and Madeleine, who married Marie-Josephte Feuilleteau, daughter of Nicolas and Françoise, in Saint-Vallier, Quebec on 15th June 1727 [2]
  • Jean Chamberlan, son of Ignace and Madeleine, who married Marguerite Lefebvre, daughter of Claude and Marie, in Saint-Valier, Quebec on 16th May 1729 [2]
  • Etienne Chamberlan, son of Gabriel and Catherine, who married Madeleine Loignon, daughter of Charles-Joseph and Marguerite, in Sainte-Famille, Quebec on 4th April 1731 [2]
  • Nicolas Chamberlan, son of Ignace and Madeleine, who married Marie-Geneviève Alaire, daughter of Joseph and Madeleine, in Saint-Valier, Quebec on 11th January 1734 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Chamberlan Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtuti nihil invium
Motto Translation: Nothing is impervious to valour.


  1. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Internoscia, Arthur E., and Claire Chevrier. Dictionnaire National des Canadiens Français 1608-1760. Vol. 1, Institut Drouin, 1958.


Houseofnames.com on Facebook