Blencowe History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Scottish annals reveal that the Blencowe surname came from a place name in Scotland, named with Viking elements. The name was no doubt taken on when they lived in the counties of the Scottish/English Borderlands.

Early Origins of the Blencowe family

The surname Blencowe was first found in Cumberland at either Great Blencow or Little Blencow, townships in the parish of Greystock, union of Penrith, Leath ward. Of interest is this entry about Little Blencow: "Near an ancient house, once the residence of the Blencows, are some dispersed ruins of buildings, particularly those of a chapel, with a burial-ground adjoining; and near the road is an inclosed cemetery, in which stands a stone cross, with the arms of the family engraved on it." [1]

One of the first records of the family was that of Adam de Blencowe who was awarded land by Edward III in 1358 and was "Standard Bearer to William, Baron of Greystoke." [2]

It is thought that original family home was built in Great Blencow. The mansion of Ennim, just south of the village was the home for many years of the Blencow family. Blencowe Hall, just to the west of Little Blencow consists of two fortified pele towers joined by connecting buildings.

"The Blencowes of Oxfordshire are probably descended from the ancient family of the name that resided at Marston or Merston, Northamptonshire, for many generations, as far back as the reign of Henry VI.; to this family belonged Sir John Blencowe, a Judge of the Common Pleas." [3]

Early History of the Blencowe family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blencowe research. Another 100 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1625, 1656, 1718, 1925, 1640, 1642, 1720, 1642, 1683, 1712 and 1701 are included under the topic Early Blencowe History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blencowe Spelling Variations

Spelling variations are extremely common among Scottish names dating from this era because the arts of spelling and translation were not yet standardized. Spelling was done by sound, and translation from Gaelic to English was generally quite careless. In different records, Blencowe has been spelled Blencoe, Blencow, Blencowe, Blacoe, Blackow, Blacowe, Blenco, Blenko, Blencko, Blanco and many more.

Early Notables of the Blencowe family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family at this time was Henry Blencowe, High Sheriff of Cumberland in 1625; and Anne Blencowe, Lady Blencowe, née Wallis (1656-1718), an English compiler of recipes. It is generally thought that she developed an early version of what is now named a "stock cube" or "bouillon cube." She called her recipes "receipts" and were kept in the library of her daughter Susanna Jennens at Weston Hall. The house passed through the female line until the book was discovered by Georgia Sitwell who arranged for the book to be published in 1925...
Another 93 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blencowe Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blencowe migration to the United States +

Those who made the voyage were greeted with ample opportunity to acquire land and a political climate far away from the oppressive monarchy of the old country. They settled along the east coast of what would become Canada and the United States. In the American War of Independence, those who remained loyal to England traveled north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. In this century, many Scots living in North America have begun to recover their rich heritage through festivals, highland games, and Clan societies. An examination of passenger and immigration lists has shown early immigrants bearing the name Blencowe:

Blencowe Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Richard Blencowe, who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1774
Blencowe Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Richard Blencowe, who arrived in New York in 1830
  • Annie Blencowe, aged 23, originally from Warrington, England, arrived in New York in 1893 aboard the ship "Teutonic" from Liverpool, England [4]
  • Isabella Blencowe, aged 50, arrived in New York in 1896 aboard the ship "New York" from Southampton, England [5]
Blencowe Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • John Blencowe, aged 53, arrived in New York in 1909 aboard the ship "Mauretania" from Liverpool, England [6]
  • Albert Blencowe, aged 49, originally from Lancaster, England, arrived in New York in 1914 aboard the ship "Baltic" from Liverpool, England [7]
  • Kate Blencowe, aged 48, originally from Lancaster, England, arrived in New York in 1914 aboard the ship "Baltic" from Liverpool, England [8]
  • John Blencowe, aged 40, arrived in New York in 1920 from Havana, Cuba [9]

Australia Blencowe migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Blencowe Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Blencowe, (b. 1804), aged 30, English Farm Servant who was convicted in Oxford, England for 14 years for larceny, transported aboard the "Henry Tanner" on 27th June 1834, settling in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1864 [10]

New Zealand Blencowe migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Blencowe Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Blencowe, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Anne Longton" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th October 1857 [11]
  • Miss Fanny Blencowe, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Anne Longton" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th October 1857 [11]
  • Miss Anne Blencowe, British settler travelling from Gravesend, UK aboard the ship "Anne Longton" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 9th October 1857 [11]
  • Mr. Edwin Blencowe, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Euphemus" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 12th February 1857 [11]

Contemporary Notables of the name Blencowe (post 1700) +

  • Robert Willis Blencowe (1791-1874), English editor for the Sussex Archaeological Society who in 1857 edited the Walter Gale diaries, the first schoolmaster of the Mayfield Charity School in Mayfield, East Sussex, (1750-1771); the diaries serve as a source about English countryside schooling at the time
  • Jack Blencowe (1891-1951), Australian rules footballer who played with Essendon and Geelong in 1912 and 1914
  • Mary Penelope Blencowe (1795-1861), English daughter of Robert Willis Blencowe, wife of Major-General James Grant CB (1778-1852)
  • Arlene Blencowe (b. 1983), Australian mixed martial artist and boxer
  • Elizabeth Blencowe (b. 1961), Australian sprint canoer at the 1984 Summer Olympics
  • Alan Blencowe (b. 1976), British auto racing driver
  • Edward Blencowe Gould (1847-1916), British Consul in Bangkok, Thailand, the first to bring Siamese cats to Europe in 1884


The Blencowe Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quorsum vivere mori
Motto Translation: Wherefore live to die.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6YF-625 : 6 December 2014), Annie Blencowe, 15 Nov 1893; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Teutonic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX73-RMH : 6 December 2014), Isabella Blencowe, 06 Jul 1896; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name New York, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JFMH-WQS : 6 December 2014), John Blencowe, 30 Sep 1909; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Mauretania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  7. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJSD-5NR : 6 December 2014), Albert Blencowe, 16 Oct 1914; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New york, ship name Baltic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  8. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJSD-5NT : 6 December 2014), Kate Blencowe, 16 Oct 1914; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New york, ship name Baltic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  9. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6CM-YYQ : 6 December 2014), John Blencowe, 13 Sep 1920; citing departure port Havana, Cuba, arrival port New York, ship name , NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  10. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th January 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/henry-tanner
  11. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate