Beddies History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Beddies family

The surname Beddies was first found in Northumberland where the name was derived from the name of an ancestor as in the son of Beatrice. An "abbreviation of the female name Beatrix." [1] The name appeared here and in Lowland Scotland. "The following variants of this surname are" found on the Border: Baetie, Baitie, Baittie, Batie, Baty, Batye, Baytie, and Bette." [2]

Early History of the Beddies family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Beddies research. Another 76 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1597, 1603, 1735, 1803, 1771 and are included under the topic Early Beddies History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Beddies Spelling Variations

The name, Beddies, occurred in many references, and from time to time, it was spelt Beattie, Beatty, Beaty, Beatie, Betay, Bety and others.

Early Notables of the Beddies family (pre 1700)

Another 46 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Beddies Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Beddies family to Ireland

Some of the Beddies family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Beddies family

The New World beckoned settlers from the Scottish-English borders. They sailed aboard the armada of sailing ships known as the "White Sails" which plied the stormy Atlantic. Some called them, less romantically, the "coffin ships." Among the early settlers bearing the Beddies surname who came to North America were: Agnes Beattie who arrived in New York City in 1774; Patrick Beatty arrived in Newcastle, Del. in 1789; William Beatty came to Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1774.



The Beddies Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Lumen coeleste sequamur
Motto Translation: May we follow heavenly inspiration.


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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