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Beaven History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Welsh name Beaven is a patronymic surname created from the Welsh personal name Evan. The surname Beaven was originally ab-Evan, or ap-Evan: the distinctive Welsh patronymic prefix "ab" or "ap," means "son of," but the prefix has been assimilated into the surname over the course of time.

Early Origins of the Beaven family


The surname Beaven was first found in Herefordshire, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Beaven family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Beaven research.
Another 197 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1695, 1923, 1691, 1765, 1602, 1586 and 1602 are included under the topic Early Beaven History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Beaven Spelling Variations


Although there are comparatively few Welsh surnames, they have a great many spelling variations. Variations of Welsh names began almost immediately after their acceptance within Welsh society. In the Middle Ages, it was up to priests and the few other people that recorded names in official documents to decide how to spell the names that they heard. Variations that occurred because of improper recording increased dramatically as the names were later transliterated into English. The Brythonic Celtic language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, featured many highly inflected sounds that could not be properly captured by the English language. Spelling variations were, however, also carried out according to an individual's design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations were all indicated by the particular variation of one's name. The spelling variations of the name Beaven have included Bevan, Beavan, Beevan, Beaven, Beven, Bevin, Bevins, Bevans, Beavans and many more.

Early Notables of the Beaven family (pre 1700)


Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Beaven Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Beaven family to the New World and Oceana


Many Welsh joined the great migrations to North America in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Like their Scottish and Irish neighbors, many Welsh families left their homeland hoping to find hope and prosperity in a land that the English did not exercise a tight rule over. Those Welsh immigrants that successfully traveled to North America went on to make significant contributions to the rapid development of both Canada and the United States in terms of the settling of land and the establishment of industry. They also added to the rich cultural heritage of both countries. An examination into the immigration and passenger lists has discovered a number of people bearing the name Beaven:

Beaven Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Thomas Beaven, who landed in New York in 1844 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Beaven Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Edward Beaven, English convict from Gloucester, who was transported aboard the "Anson" on September 23, 1843, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Anson voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1843 with 499 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/anson/1843
  • Francis Beaven, aged 25, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Taymouth Castle" [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    South Australian Register Tuesday 26th June 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Taymouth Castle 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/taymouthcastle1855.shtml.
  • Emma Beaven, aged 28, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Taymouth Castle" [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    South Australian Register Tuesday 26th June 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Taymouth Castle 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/taymouthcastle1855.shtml.

Contemporary Notables of the name Beaven (post 1700)


  • Thomas Daniel Beaven (1851-1920), the second Roman Catholic Bishop of Springfield in Massachusetts (1892 to 1920)
  • Luke Edward Beaven (b. 1989), English cricketer
  • Peter Jamieson Beaven (1925-2012), New Zealand architect based in Christchurch, one of two architects that have been awarded the New Zealand Institute of Architects gold medal
  • The Rt Rev Frederick Hicks Beaven, Bishop of Mashonaland (1911 to 1925)
  • James Beaven (1801-1875), Canadian Church of England clergyman and author
  • Derek Beaven (b. 1947), British novelist, recipient of the Commonwealth Writers Prize
  • Ellie Beaven (b. 1980), English actress
  • Professor Sir Donald Ward "Don" Beaven KNZM, CBE (1924-2009), New Zealand medical researcher in the area of diabetes treatment and prevention
  • Robert Beaven (1836-1920), Canadian politician and businessman, 6th Premier of British Columbia (1882 to 1883)

The Beaven Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Semper virtuti constans
Motto Translation: Always constant to virtue.


Beaven Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Anson voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1843 with 499 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/anson/1843
  3. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 26th June 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Taymouth Castle 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/taymouthcastle1855.shtml.

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