Show ContentsBattcyck History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the name Battcyck begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is derived from the personal name Bartholomew. Bat(e) was a pet form of this personal name and when combined with 'cock' which was a common suffix for other names like Wilcox, Simcock and others became Batcock. [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Battcyck family

The surname Battcyck was first found in Worcestershire where Edrich Bathecoc was listed in the Assize Rolls for 1221. Later, the mononym Batecok was listed in the Assize Rolls for 1288 in Cheshire and later again, the same rolls listed Richard Batcok in 1285. Down in Dorset, we found William Badecok in 1297. [1]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Geoffrey Batecok, London; William Badecok, Cambridgeshire; and Robert Batecoc, Oxfordshire. [2] In Somerset, Kirby's Quest lists Stephen Badcok and Badokok Jerveys, 1 Edward III (during the first year of the reign of King Edward III) [3]

"The Rev. Samuel Badcock, the eminent divine, was born at South Molton in 1747, the son of a butcher, and the name still belongs to that trade in the town. There was a William Badecok in Cambridgeshire in the 13th century." [4]

Early History of the Battcyck family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Battcyck research. Another 88 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1563, 1609, 1622, 1668, 1698, 1721, 1744, 1747, 1749, 1766, 1783, 1786, 1788, 1790, 1797, 1809, 1821, 1859 and 1861 are included under the topic Early Battcyck History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Battcyck Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Battcyck has been recorded under many different variations, including Babcock, Badcock, Babbcock, Batcock, Badcocke and many more.

Early Notables of the Battcyck family

Distinguished members of the family include William Badcock (1622-1698), a London goldsmith and hilt-maker, admitted to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths of London in September 1668. Samuel Badcock (1747-1788), theological and literary critic, was born at South Molton, Devon, 23 Feb. 1747. His parents were dissenters, and he was educated in a school at Ottery St. Mary, which was reserved for the sons of those opposed to the English church. He was trained for the dissenting ministry, and in 1766 became the pastor of a congregation at Wimborne in...
Another 89 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Battcyck Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Battcyck family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Battcyck or a variant listed above: James Babcock, who arrived in Plymouth, MA in 1623; William Badcocke, who came to St. Christopher in 1633; David Babcock, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1640.



  1. Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  4. Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.


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