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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The ancient Pictish-Scottish family that first used the name Baorth lived in the lands of Beath in Fife. The name is a topographic or local surname, which was given to a family who held a barony or lands, had houses, manors or estates in that area. The name could have also been derived from the Gaelic beith which means birch tree.

Baorth Early Origins



The surname Baorth was first found in Fife, at the Hill of Beath, a hill and a village in Fife, Scotland just outside Dunfermline and joined to Cowdenbeath. The village is best known as the location of the meeting of the Covenanters at which John Blackadder was one of the preachers in the summer of 1670. As of 1896, it had a population of about 1,300 people.

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Baorth Spelling Variations


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Baorth Spelling Variations



The arts of spelling and translation were yet in their infancies when surnames began, so there are an enormous number of spelling variations of the names in early Scottish records. This is a particular problem with Scottish names because of the numerous times a name might have been loosely translated to English from Gaelic and back. Baorth has been spelled Beath, Beeth, Beith, Bait, Baith and others.

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Baorth Early History


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Baorth Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Baorth research. Another 225 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1231 and 1696 are included under the topic Early Baorth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Baorth Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Baorth Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Baorth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



This oppression forced many Scots to leave their homelands. Most of these chose North America as their destination. Although the journey left many sick and poor, these immigrants were welcomed the hardy with great opportunity. Many of these settlers stood up for their newfound freedom in the American War of Independence. More recently, Scots abroad have recovered much of their collective heritage through highland games and other patriotic functions and groups. An examination of passenger and immigration lists has located various settlers bearing the name Baorth: Robert Beath who settled in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in 1766; Henry and Robert Beath arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1830; Robert Beeth settled in Savannah, Georgia, in 1820.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna virtute
Motto Translation: By good fortune and valour.


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Baorth Family Crest Products


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Baorth Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. The Charters of David I The Written Acts of David I King of Scots, 1124-53 and of His Son Henry, Earl of Northumerland, 1139-52. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999. Print.
    2. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
    3. Dorward, David. Scottish Surnames. Glasgow: Harper Collins, 1995. Print.
    4. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
    5. Moody David. Scottish Family History. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0806312688).
    6. Warner, Philip Warner. Famous Scottish Battles. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1996. Print. (ISBN 0-76070-004-4).
    7. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    8. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    9. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
    10. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and Don Pottinger. Clan Map Scotland of Old. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1983. Print.
    11. ...

    The Baorth Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Baorth Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 9 April 2013 at 08:23.

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